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...and carefully read what you find!


January 18-22, 2016: Welcome to Third Term!

Monday, January 18: MLK Holiday (Human Rights Day)
Tuesday, January 19: Professional Day (No School for Students)

  • This term you will learn...
  • ...to analyze, appreciate, and author poetic epitaphs.
  • ...to close read "Interactive Fiction" to solve a mystery.
  • ...to read and understand epic poetry.
  • ...a bit about Greek mythology.
  • ...how to use semicolons and colons correctly.
  • ...how to write and present a podcast.
  • ...yet more word cells!
  • ...to read.
  • ...to write.
  • ...to repeat.
  • ...and, as always, some surprises!
  • New Term, New Semester, New Reading Schedules, New Classmates, New Seats, New Hall Passes, New (Epic) Poems, New Voices, New Arguments...

Wednesday, January 20: A Day
Thursday, January 21: B Day


Friday, January 22: A Day (Writing Lab)



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

January 25-29, 2016

Monday, January 25: B Day (Writing Lab)


Tuesday, January 26: A Day
Wednesday, January 27: B Day

  • Literature
  • Poems o' the Day: Spoon River Anthology
  • Spoon River Anthology is a mash-up of poetry, drama, and fiction. Masters presents a series of first-person monologues as they appear on the gravestones in a Midwestern cemetery in the early 1900s. The characters “speak” their own poetic epitaphs from beyond the grave, confessing the true motivations of their lives and uncovering many of the mysteries and secrets of the town. The voices of the former residents of Spoon River often appear in clusters that present all sides of a story that would be incomplete if presented by only a single voice. Each epitaph may be appreciated for its own poetic merits, but by cross-referencing them with each other, the careful reader learns elements of the underlying (get it?) narrative that even the characters themselves do not understand.
  • Introduction to Poetic Epitaphs: Meet Aragog!
  • Welcome to Spoon River: Introduction (22 min.)
  • Travel back a century in time by talking to some of the the sleepers on The Hill: Elsa Wertman, Hamilton Greene, Richard Bone, Rutherford McDowell, Hortense Robbins, Anne Rutledge, Hannah Armstrong, Knowlt Hoheimer
  • Journal #3: Write a (first-person) poetic epitaph for a fictional character you know. Model yours on the multiple examples we have studied today.


Thursday, January 28: A Day
Friday, January 29: B Day

  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #1
  • Add these to your Third Term Word Cells:
  • Reading/Literature & Composition: The Rhodes Affair
  • Read each of these epitaphs carefully: Eugene Carman, Clarence Fawcett, Mrs. George Reece, Jack McGuire, Nicholas Bindle, Henry Phipps, Ralph Rhodes, Thomas Rhodes
  • Group Work: Describe each character and explain what part the character played in "The Rhodes Affair."
  • Include the voice (tone) of the character as well as the feeling (mood) it creates in the reader: How does the character feel about his/her life? How do you feel about the character?
  • Sample: Eugene Carman is bitter and resentful. For 14 years he worked long hours for little pay in a store owned by Thomas Rhodes. Because Rhodes was influential in the church, Carman had to attend services twice a week to keep up appearances. Overcome by rage and resentment for spending so much of his life as "Rhodes' slave," he starts screaming at his reflection, which causes him to have a brain aneurysm and die. I feel sorry for Eugene Carman because he believed he was powerless; he felt that he was controlled by Thomas Rhodes. Maybe he really was.
  • Individual Work [Finish as Homework]: Using textual evidence from the epitaphs in the cycle of epitaphs called The Rhodes Affair," write a one-page character sketch of Thomas Rhodes. What kind of a man was he, and what influence did he have on the town of Spoon River? Support your statements with quotes from the various epitaphs of other townspeople.
  • Informational Preview: Interactive Fiction (Zork, anyone?)
  • Optional Enrichment: Want to get yourself ready to win the game next week?
  • Familiarize yourself with the relationships between the characters in these epitaphs:
  • Judge Somers & Chase Henry
  • Editor Whedon & Carl Hamblin
  • The Town Marshal & Jack McGuire
  • Ollie McGee & Fletcher McGee
  • Cooney Potter & Fiddler Jones


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

February 1-5, 2016

Monday, February 1: A Day (VOSR)
Tuesday, February 2: B Day (VOSR)


Wednesday, February 3: A Day (VOSR)
Thursday, February 4: B Day (VOSR)


Friday, February 5: A Day


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

February 8-12, 2016

Monday, Februrary 8: B Day


Tuesday, February 9: A Day
Wednesday, February 10: B Day

  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #3
  • Spoon River Final Test
  • (You may use your completed Spoon River Review...assuming you finished it.)
  • Creative Writing Assignment [Drafts due next time!]
  • Here is a model of the whole process.
  • Journal #5: Valentine's Day is coming up. Who is your Valentine? Does that person know s/he is your Valentine? (Does anyone else know?) What are your thoughts on teen romance? Romeo and Juliet are about your age, and they fall in love and get married within only a couple days of their first meeting...but it doesn't turn out so well, does it? Do you think this kind of "love at first sight" is something that can actually happen? Is teenage love or "puppy love" real love? How can you tell? Fill the page!


Thursday, February 11: A Day (Writing Lab)
Friday, February 12: B Day (Writing Lab)



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

February 15-19, 2016

Monday, Februrary 15: Day of Presidents (No School)


Tuesday, February 16: A Day
Wednesday, February 17: B Day


Thursday, February 18: A Day
Friday, February 19: B Day



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

February 22-26, 2016

Monday, February 22: A Day
Tuesday, February 23: B Day

  • Epitaphs: Final Draft due now!
  • Independent Reading Book #1 Test
  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #6
  • -pro-
  • -contra-
  • -path-
  • -mega-
  • Poem o' the Day: "In the God's Dreams" by James Laughlin
  • Meet the Olympians
  • Journal #1 : If you were the god or goddess of something, what would it be and why? Describe your symbol, weapon/gadget. What special power would you have? Who would pray to you for help and protection? Discuss. Also discuss which of these characters from mythology you would like to learn more about and why. (Fill the Page!)


Wednesday, February 24: A Day (Writing Lab)
Thursday, February 25: B Day (Writing Lab) (PT Conferences)

  • Bullying Survey: Follow instructions on the board in the lab.
  • Revise Practice Essay from last time.
  • Be sure to include at least two (2) pieces of textual evidence (with citations and elaboration) in each body paragraph!
  • Resubmit to Utah Compose.
  • "Request" some evaluations from the score page.
  • Evaluate some of your classmates' essays using the tools in Utah Compose.
  • Wiki: Post a copy of your Word Cell Podcast at the top of your wiki page.
  • Mythology Grid


Friday, February 26: A Day




Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

February 29-March 4, 2016

Monday, February 29: B Day

  • [Sub Nightmare]
  • Let's pretend this day of class never happened, okay?

Tuesday, March 1: A/B Day (ACT at high schools)


Wednesday, March 2: A Day (Media Center)
Thursday, March 3: B Day (Media Center)

  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #8 [moved to next time]
  • Mythology Topic Assignments
  • Assignment: Write a multi-paragraph, research-based, informational paper that....
  • How does your assigned hero/adventure illustrate the Heroic Cycle?
  • How does your assigned god/goddess illustrate common themes/motifs in Greek mythology?
  • Works Cited Page
  • In-text citations
  • Begin Library Research


Friday, March 4: A Day



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

March 7-11, 2015

Monday, March 7: B Day

  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #7
  • -micro-
  • -anti-
  • -phon-
  • -man-
  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #8
  • -syn- / -sym-
  • -hypo-
  • -hyper-
  • -script- / -scrib-
  • Word Cells Presentations: Set #9
  • -son-
  • -a-
  • -ver-
  • -nom- / -onym-
  • [Extra Credit Podcast Assignments]
  • Research Writing Prompt/Discussion [Synthesizing/Comparing]
  • Heroes: How does the adventure illustrate the Heroic Cycle (Hero's Journey)? What other heroic adventures are similar? Explain.
  • Gods/Goddesses: Which Common Themes in Greek Mythology does the myth illustrate? What other gods/goddesses or stories are similar? Explain.
  • [Return] Library Research Handout: Finish it by next Thursday -- Library is open during Intervention (first 35 in only) and at lunch.
  • Journal #2: What does it require for someone to be a hero? What qualities does a hero possess? Tell the story of a heroic act you have witnessed and explain why you thought it was heroic. Can anyone be a hero, or does it require something outside of our control (like size or strength)? Who is your hero? Why? Define and discuss heroes. Fill the page!
  • [Qualities of the Ancient Greek Hero: Physical Strength, Intelligence, Guile, Bravery, Loyalty, Close to the gods, Leadership]
  • Practice the Elements of Epic Poetry
  • Homeric Similes and Epithets from the Odyssey of [Your Name Here]
  • What is a Homeric simile (epic simile)? Write one of your own.
  • What is an epithet? Write some to describe people you know.
  • The Odyssey Intro -- Invocation to the Muse Assignment
  • What elements of the Heroic Cycle do you see in this introductory prayer?
  • Can you identify an epithet or two?


Tuesday, March 8: A Day (Writing Lab)
Wednesday, March 9: B Day (Writing Lab)


Thursday, March 10: A Day (Writing Lab)
Friday, March 11: B Day (Writing Lab)



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

March 14-18, 2016

Monday, March 14: A Day
Tuesday, March 15: B Day


Wednesday, March 16: A Day (Research Paper due Now!)
Thursday, March 17: B Day (Research Paper due Now!)

  • Turn in Research Paper: Final Draft + Works Cited Page + Checklist/Score Rubric
  • Post final draft of the essay (not Works Cited page) to Utah Compose by tomorrow night.
  • Journal #4: So, what's the big deal about these journals? Why is it so freakin' hard to fill the page?! After you answer those questions, make a list of at least 15 journal topics that you could write about for at least ten minutes. Number them clearly.
  • The Odyssey, continued:
  • The Cyclops (MPT, pp. 660-670) + Assignment: Passage Analysis
  • The Enchantress Circe (on your own)
  • Grammar Punk: Semicolons (Rule #3)

  • Third Term Word Cells: Study 'em all for next time!


Friday, March 18: A Day (JT 19)

  • Third Term Word Cells Final Exam
  • Journal #5: Look at the list of topics you created last time. Fill the page writing about Topic #5.
  • The Odyssey:
  • The Land of the Dead (MPT, pp. 675-677)
  • The Sirens; Scylla and Charybdis & The Cattle of the Sun God (MPT, pp. 678-686)
  • Assignment: Passage Analysis -- Use information from the three sections we read today to complete the handout. (Keep the handout with your Odyssey map.)
  • Grammar Punk: Colon Rule 1



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

March 21-25, 2016

Monday, March 21: B Day

  • Third Term Word Cells Final Exam
  • Journal #5: Look at the list of topics you created last time. Fill the page writing about Topic #5.
  • The Odyssey:
  • The Land of the Dead (MPT, pp. 675-677)
  • The Sirens; Scylla and Charybdis & The Cattle of the Sun God (MPT, pp. 678-686)
  • Assignment: Passage Analysis -- Use information from the three sections we read today to complete the handout. (Keep the handout with your Odyssey map.)
  • Grammar Punk: Colon Rule 1


Tuesday, March 22: A Day
Wednesday, March 23: B Day

  • For all intents and purposes, this is the absolute last day of the term. No make-up and no excuses after today!
  • Turn in Extra Credit/Hall Passes
  • Book Test/Review #2: Due now!
  • Journal #6: Look at the list of topics you created last week. Fill the page writing about Topic #6.
  • Turn in/Score Journals.
  • The Odyssey:
  • "Coming Home," p. 690
  • The Meeting of Father and Son, pp. 691-694
  • The Beggar and the Faithful Dog, pp 694-695
  • Summary: The Epic Continues
  • The Test of the Great Bow, pp. 698-702
  • Death at the Palace, pp. 703-705
  • Odysseus and Penelope, pp. 706-709
  • Grammar Punk: Colon Rule 2
  • Mythology Grid : Work on this if you have time left over.


Thursday, March 24: A Day
Officially, this is the last day of the term, but in reality it is the beginning of the fourth term!

  • Finish The Odyssey:
  • Turn in: Map/Folk Epic + Passage Analysis/Homeric Similes + Mythology Grid + Movie Questions
  • Welcome to the beginning of the end!
  • Hall Passes, Handouts, and Return to Routines



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions
Q: "Did I miss anything?"
A: Yes.
^ Scroll up to find it. ^

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