Wink...Wink! Daily Assignments Title Graphic
Grades/Homework
Utah Write
StudySync
Put a Book on Trial
Grammar Punk
Thompson's Textbook
Falcon Forum
Book Review Outline
Word Cells
Word Cells Biglist
To see all the weeks in the term, scroll ALL THE WAY DOWN!

August 26-30, 2013: Welcome Back!
Term 1: "Why?" and "How to..."

  • This term you will learn WHY...
  • ...literacy matters. (Communication)
  • ...people read and write outside of school. (Purpose + Audience = Genre)
  • This term you will learn HOW TO...
  • ...ask questions.
  • ...have a conversation.
  • ...develop an argument: evidence, warrant, conclusion.
  • ...put a book on trial.
  • ...write a simple argumentative essay.
  • ...close read and annotate text.
  • ...figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word by recognizing its "cells.".
  • ...StudySync.
  • ...identify the parts of speech.
  • ...accept responsibility.
  • ...work in a group.
  • ...analyze the elements of fiction in various texts.

So, let's get started!
Monday, August 26: A Day
Tuesday, August 27: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Invitation" by Shel Silverstein
  • Letters from Last Year: What're we really in for?
  • QAR Intro: Ask me some questions.
  • Talk, Talk, Talk
  • Disclosure Discussion
  • Reading Requirements
  • Notebook Needs
  • QAR Practice: Ask and answer some questions from the disclosure.
  • Homework: Discuss everything we talked about today with your parents, have one of them sign the form, return it next time.


Wednesday, August 28: A Day (Writing Lab)
Thursday, August 29: B Day (Writing Lab)

  • Turn in Disclosure Contract with Signatures
  • Poem o' the Day: "Writer Waiting" by Shel Silverstein
  • Caveat Scriptor: PRINT NOTHING TODAY!
  • Everything will be done digitally. Waste no paper!
  • StudySync Setup
  • Log in as you did last year. (Only those not here last year will create a new account.)
  • Login Protocols: School e-mail address + PIN
  • Join Group: Honors English 9 (group code provided in class)
  • StudySync Assignment #1: Fahrenheit 451
  • Write and save the essay in Microsoft Word.
  • Copy and Paste it into the appropriate field in StudySync and submit.
  • Keep the Word document open.
  • Utah Write Setup/Login
  • Log in as you did last year. (Only those not here last year will create a new account.)
  • Login Protocols: School Login Name (17BBANDERMEYER) + PIN
  • Go to the Course Enrollment Page. Enter Course Code (provided in class).
  • Utah Write Assignment: Paste StudySync Response into Utah Write. Make adjustments as indicated by the Utah Write instructions. (Argumentative Writing: It has to contain all the elements!)
  • Submit for a score. Do not revise.
  • Time Remaining? Read this.


Friday, August 30: A Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "The Hand" by Mary Ruefle
  • Hall Passes: You get one per term. Use it wisely!
  • Three-ring Binder: You need one for English here today!
    (Thompson's Textbook: Let the handouts commence!)
  • Review QAR and put handout in the right section.
  • Read this and complete this QAR Worksheet in response.
  • Conisder the claims made by the article in light of this poem and the essay you wrote last time about Montag and Clarisse.
  • Writing Notebooks: Select one. Write now. Right now!
    Turn to the third page in your notebook and write for ten minutes. Introduce yourself! Fill the page!
  • WN: The Finer Details
    Copy this quotation on the first page of your WN:
    "You learn to write by writing. The only way to learn to write is to force yourself to produce a certain number of words on a regular basis."
    --William Zinsser
Writing Notebook Guidelines:
Copy these under the quote on the first page.
  • Put each entry on a new page.
  • Date every entry in this format: August 30, 2013
    (Spelling, spacing, and punctuation all count!)
  • Never remove any pages from your writing notebook, even after they have been scored.
  • Writing Notebooks are to remain in the classroom at all times!

  • (Writing Notebooks remain in the classroom!)
  • Finish the QAR Worksheet.




  • September 2-6, 2013

    Monday, September 2: Labor Day

    • No School: Labor Day Holiday
    • Poem o' the Day: "What Work Is" by Philip Levine


    Tuesday, September 3: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "The Hand" by Mary Ruefle
    • Hall Passes: You get one per term. Use it wisely!
    • Three-ring Binder: You need one for English here today!
      (Thompson's Textbook: Let the handouts commence!)
    • Review QAR and put handout in the right section.
    • Read this and complete this QAR Worksheet in response.
    • Conisder the claims made by the article in light of this poem and the essay you wrote last time about Montag and Clarisse.
    • Writing Notebooks: Select one. Write now. Right now!
      Turn to the third page in your notebook and write for ten minutes. Introduce yourself! Fill the page!
    • WN: The Finer Details
      Copy this quotation on the first page of your WN:
      "You learn to write by writing. The only way to learn to write is to force yourself to produce a certain number of words on a regular basis."
      --William Zinsser
    Writing Notebook Guidelines:
    Copy these under the quote on the first page.
    • Put each entry on a new page.
    • Date every entry in this format: September 3, 2013
      (Spelling, spacing, and punctuation all count!)
    • Never remove any pages from your writing notebook, even after they have been scored.
    • Writing Notebooks are to remain in the classroom at all times!

  • (Writing Notebooks remain in the classroom!)
  • Finish the QAR Worksheet.



  • Wednesday, September 4: A Day
    Thursday, September 5: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "Cartoon Physics, Part 1" by Nick Flynn
    • Term 1 Reading Schedule + Assign F451 Books
    • Close Reading and Annotation: Reference Handout for English Notebook
      Use the suggestions on the handout to
    • Close Read & Annotate "How Writing By Hand Makes Kids Smarter"
    • (Here are some models that received full credit. Do yours as completely and thoroughly as these are done!)
    • Writing Notebook: Write a one-page reflection on the article. What parts of the article are supported by your own experience? Which parts do you disagree with? Do you prefer to write by hand or with a keyboard? Do your type and text more than you write by hand? Do you think those who write by hand more often are smarter?
    • (Time Permitting: In the space at the end of the article about handwriting, write one of each of the four types of QAR questions about the article. Answer the questions. Turn in the article with your annotations.)
    • Begin Reading Fahrenheit 451.
      (Be to page 31 next time!)


    Friday, September 6: A Day

    • F451: Reading Quiz/Discussion (Textual Evidence)
      • What did you notice?
      • What did you wonder?
      • What did you not "get"? (Refer to specific passages. Share them.)
      • How is the society of this novel like and different from our own?
      • (QAR: Write and answer one "right there" question, one "think and search" question, and one "author and me" question from the first 31 pages of reading. Like these!)
    • Poem o' the Day: "The School Where I Studied" by Yehuda Amichai
    • Writing Notebook: (Refer to pp. 28-31 in F451.) Do you agree with some of the assertions Clarisse makes about education? Do you think your experience in school has anything in common with hers? If so, give examples. If not, explain the difference between your school and Clarisse's. Use quotations from Clarisse to either illustrate or contradict your opinions. Fill the page!
    • Reading/Writing Strategy: SOAPSTone
    • Close Read the Monologue: "What They Learn in School" by Jerome Stern
    • SOAPSTone it on a separate paper and turn the paper in.
    • Answer the following Study Questions in writing (on the page itself): 9,10, 12, 13, 16, 19 (due next time)
    • Reading Schedule: Read to page 53 by next time!
    • Symbolism in Section One: The Hearth and the Salamander



    September 9-13, 2013

    Monday, September 9: B Day

    • F451: Reading Quiz/Discussion (Textual Evidence)
      • What did you notice?
      • What did you wonder?
      • What did you not "get"? (Refer to specific passages. Share them.)
      • How is the society of this novel like and different from our own?
      • (QAR: Write and answer one "right there" question, one "think and search" question, and one "author and me" question from the first 31 pages of reading. Like these!)
    • Poem o' the Day: "The School Where I Studied" by Yehuda Amichai
    • Writing Notebook: (Refer to pp. 28-31 in F451.) Do you agree with some of the assertions Clarisse makes about education? Do you think your experience in school has anything in common with hers? If so, give examples. If not, explain the difference between your school and Clarisse's. Use quotations from Clarisse to either illustrate or contradict your opinions. Fill the page!
    • Reading/Writing Strategy: SOAPSTone
    • Close Read the Monologue: "What They Learn in School" by Jerome Stern
    • SOAPSTone it on a separate paper and turn the paper in.
    • Answer the following Study Questions in writing (on the page itself): 9,10, 12, 13, 16, 19 (due next time)
    • Reading Schedule: Read to page 53 by next time!
    • Symbolism in Section One: The Hearth and the Salamander


    Tuesday, September 10: A Day (Writing Lab)
    Wednesday, September 11: B Day (Writing Lab)

    • Poem o' the Day: "Much Madness is Divinest Sense" by Emily Dickinson
    • Scholastic Reading Inventory: Remember your lexile level. I'll tell you what they mean when everyone is finished.
    • StudySync: Review two (2) of your classmates' essays from last time. Provide critical (but polite) comments and suggestions to help them improve their arguments. Suggest ways they might develop their thesis more completely. Offer counterarguments they need to address. Your comments are more important than the number ranking you give. (Also, keep in mind that although you are anonymous to each other, you are not anonymous to me. The quality of your constructive feedback will ultimately be part of your score.)
    • "Lecture": What does REVISION mean?
    • Revise: Open the Word document that contains the essay you submitted to StudySync and Utah Write the last time we were in the Writing Lab. Consider the resources we have examined since then: you've read 50 more pages in the novel; we QARed an article about mental health; and we have seen what Emily Dickinson said about madness. Using these resources, the suggestions about revision, and your own greater understanding of the novel and its issues, revise your essay and submit it ONE TIME in Utah Write for a better score.
    • Blasts: It's time to start 'em.
    • Reading Schedule: To page 77 by next time.
    • Symbolism in Section One: The Hearth and the Salamander
    • Beatty's Lecture Summary (if you get confused while reading pp. 53-63)


    Thursday, September 12: A Day
    Friday, September 13: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "Of Modern Books" by Carolyn Wells
    • F451 Reading Quiz (to page 77) -- Are you thinking about the greater issues and themes?
    • Review: "You can't ever have my books." (pp. 36-40)
    • Beatty's Lecture Summary (pp. 53-63)
    • Symbolism in Section One: The Hearth and the Salamander
      (Notice how textual evidence is used in both links to support the claim.
      )
    • Preview: "Denham's Dentifrice" (pp.78-80): Symbolism of The Sieve and the Sand
    • Writing Notebook: Read the Matt Groening cartoon about school. Look at the WN entry you made last time. Do you see any common themes? What point is the cartoon making? Is this how you perceive school? Why or why not? Give an example. Also, are modern schools creating thinkers and problem solvers, or are they creating rule followers who are scared to think for themselves? Which are you? Explain.
    • Here is Thompson's response to this prompt.
    • New SAGE Performance Assessment Sample (F451): Try it!
    • F451: Read to page 100 by next time!




    September 16-20, 2013

    Monday, September 16: A Day
    Tuesday, September 17: B Day

    • F451 Quiz (to page 100)
    • Writing Notebook: Montag's Dilemma -- Which book would you save? Why? Fill the front of the page!
    • Discuss Faber's Lecture (pp. 80-91): What's Wrong With TV?
    • Assignment to be completed at home: Videots (for discussion next time)
    • Poem o' the Day: "Dover Beach" by Matthew Arnold
    • Mildred and Friends: Products of a "Parlor" Culture (pp.93-101)
    • "Dover Beach"/F451 Assignment: Fill the back of the page in WN.
    • Introduction to Word Cells + Morphology & Etymology Podcasts
    • QAR one of them; SOAPSTone the other.
    • Now you should be able to figure out the meaning of this word:
      pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis
    • We'll cover a few word cells every week for the rest of the year! Keep a list!
    • Read to page 129 by next time!


    Wednesday, September 18: A Day
    Thursday, September 19: B Day


    Friday, September 20: A Day (Writing Lab)

    • Poem o' the Day: "Did I Miss Anything?" by Tom Wayman
    • StudySync BLASTS: It's Official! Start doin' 'em! From now on, this is a weekly assignment, which will be checked a couple times per term. You could come into the lab on an Intervention period if you don't have time
    • Elements of Argumentation
    • SAGE Performance Assessment Sample (F451) -- Models
    • Midterm Paper (this one for an actual score): Final REVISION
    • Okay, we have been reading, writing, talking, and thinking about these issues for almost four weeks, so now it is time to put it all together into an excellent argumentative essay. If you stayed on the reading schedule, you have finished the novel. We have examined and discussed various elements of it, as well as numerous other outside texts with similar themes. You should be prepared to make a solid, defensible claim supported by lots of textual evidence. The question you addressed originally will no longer contain all your brilliant ideas, so don't feel bound to keep making the same claims and arguments you did to begin with. Expand! REVISE! Your final essay should not only illustrate your broader understanding of these many issues and the content of the novel, but it should also contain the following elements: Attention getter, background information, thesis statement (that the rest of the argument will support), lots of textual evidence from various sources, warrants for all textual evidence (i.e., explain how the evidence supports your claims), acknowledgement and rebuttal of counterclaims, and a conclusion.
    • Finish Fahrenheit 451 and the Literary Elements Worksheet for next time!




    September 23-27, 2013

    Monday, September 23: B Day (Writing Lab)

    • Poem o' the Day: "Did I Miss Anything?" by Tom Wayman
    • StudySync BLASTS: It's Official! Start doin' 'em! From now on, this is a weekly assignment, which will be checked a couple times per term. You could come into the lab on an Intervention period if you don't have time
    • Elements of Argumentation
    • SAGE Performance Assessment Sample (F451)
      Annotated Models: The margin notes identify some of the elements that argumentative writing must contain.
    • Midterm Paper (this one for an actual score): Final REVISION
    • Okay, we have been reading, writing, talking, and thinking about these issues for almost four weeks, so now it is time to put it all together into an excellent argumentative essay. If you stayed on the reading schedule, you have finished the novel. We have examined and discussed various elements of it, as well as numerous other outside texts with similar themes. You should be prepared to make a solid, defensible claim supported by lots of textual evidence. The question you addressed originally will no longer contain all your brilliant ideas, so don't feel bound to keep making the same claims and arguments you did to begin with. Expand! REVISE! Your final essay should not only illustrate your broader understanding of these many issues and the content of the novel, but it should also contain the following elements: Attention getter, background information, thesis statement (that the rest of the argument will support), lots of textual evidence from various sources, warrants for all textual evidence (i.e., explain how the evidence supports your claims), acknowledgement and rebuttal of counterclaims, and a conclusion.
    • Finish Fahrenheit 451 and the Literary Elements Worksheet for next time!



    Tuesday, September 24: A Day
    Wednesday, September 25: B Day

    • Fahrenheit 451 Test & Turn in Literary Elements Worksheet
    • Writing Notebook: Choose five of the topics listed below and write a theme sentence for each that clearly states something Fahrenheit 451 intended to convey about the topic. Then identify a passage from the book (with page number!) that supports the theme. (Refer to the Literary Elements Handout to see how a theme should be stated.) The first one is done as a sample.
      • Language: Those who control the language control history. According to the brief histories in Firemen of America (pp. 34-35), Benjamin Franklin was the first fireman and firemen always started fires rather than put them out. Because the government controls the language (books), they can rewrite history to say whatever they want.
      • Choice
      • Identity
      • Conformity/Rebellion
      • Independence/Individualism
      • Saints/Sacrifices/Scapegoats
      • Crime or "sin" (and who defines it)
      • "Ignorance is bliss"
      • Fear
      • Discovery
      • Leadership/Power
      • Technology
    • Perfect Irony: Hey, where's our next book?
    • Revised Reading Schedule
    • "O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman
    • Genre Studies: SOAPSTone the articles using this handout & answer the questions on the back.



    Thursday, September 26: A Day
    Friday, September 27: B Day

    • Midterm Paper: Final Revision Must be submitted to Utah Write by Friday @ 8:00 P.M.
    • Still struggling with Utah Write? Here are some hints.
    • Finish this: Genre Studies: SOAPSTone the articles using this handout.
    • WN: Create your own Genre Alphabet on page 2.
    • Poem o' the Day: "Thoughts in a Zoo" by Countee Cullen
    • Revised Reading Schedule: Throw the old one away.
    • New Books & Study Guide
    • Animal Farm: Read Chapters 1 & 2 for next time.
    • Writing Notebook: A good leader is _____________. Describe the qualities of a good leader. Write about someone you know who is or would be a good leader and tell why. Conversely, write about someone you know who would make a poor leader. What is it that good leaders understand that poor leaders do not? Discuss. Fill the page!




    September 30-October 4, 2013

    Monday, September 30: A Day
    Tuesday, October 1: B Day

    • AF: Chapter 2 Discussion
    • Poem o' the Day: "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley
    • Check out these videos: 1, 2, 3, 4
    • Word Cells o' the Week: Start your lists!
    • Neologolusion: Creating New Words & Making Sense of Unfamiliar Ones
      • Using your lists of prefixes/suffixes and the Word Cells we've learned so far, create a new word and its dictionary definition. Fill in ALL the blanks!
    • Writing Notebook: Parent-Teacher Conferences are this week. If your parent(s) was/were going to come to the conferences, how would the conversation go when they got to my table? Write the dialogue that you think would take place about you. Fill the page!
    • What is Satire?
    • Reading: AF III & IV for next time (Who do you trust?)
    • What is being satirized in these chapters?


    Wednesday, October 2: A Day (Writing Lab)
    Thursday, October 3: B Day (Writing Lab)

    • Poem o' the Day: "Alexander Throckmorton" by Edgar Lee Masters
    • StudySync: Assignment -- Animal Farm
    • Read Chapter V
    • Watch the StudySync Discussion to get ideas you can use for your response.
    • Write/Submit a response to this prompt: Squealer says that Napoleon thinks all animals are equal. But then he tells the animals that only Napoleon can be trusted to make decisions. Analyze this apparent contradiction. What does the excerpt have to say about leadership and power? Support your claim with textual evidence.
    • Reading: AF V & VI for next time


    Friday, October 4: A Day



    October 7-11, 2013

    Monday, October 7: B Day


    Tuesday, October 8: A Day
    Wednesday, October 9: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "Ego" by Denise
    • Turn in your close reading of the Declaration of Independence
    • Writing Notebook: SOAPSTone and then Summarize the Declaration of Independence at a rate of one sentence per paragraph/section. Why is this a significant document? Could such a document help the animals on Animal Farm? Why or why not? Fill the page!
    • Word Cells o' the Week: -gram-/-graph-, -scrib-/script-, -dict-,
      -string- / -strict- / -strain-
    • Neologolusion (x2): Creating New Words
    • Using your lists of prefixes/suffixes and two (2) of the Word Cells we learned today, create two new words and their dictionary definitions. Fill in ALL the blanks! This will mean you should have the entire front side of the Neologolusion handout finished!
    • How deceptive can language be, Squealer?
    • DHMO Society
    • Bread: The Root of All Evil
    • Language Issues: Doublespeak
      (Read/Discuss the first few sections.)
    • Euphemisms are doublespeak when they are used to deceive.
    • Reading: AF IX for next time
    • Study Guide (page 2)


    Thursday, October 10: A Day
    Friday, October 11: B Day

    • Grammar Punk Rock Parts of Speech Review: Adjectives & Adverbs
    • Poem o' the Day: "Won't Get Fooled Again" by The Who
    • Beware of those who use language for evil!
    • Doublespeak & Logical Fallacies (Larger List) & Propaganda
    • Pair Assignments: Using any/all of the resources you have been provided, study/analyze your assigned topic and prepare to present the following:
      • A definition we can easily understand
      • An example of it from Animal Farm (if applicable)
      • A real-world example (scripted & performed like a skit)
      • A "test" or appropriate response we can use to avoid being fooled by this strategy
    • Topics: Euphemism, Jargon, Gobbledegook, Inflated Language, False Cause, Begging the Question, Red Herring, Black or White (False Dilemma), Ad Hominem, Glory/Guilt by Association, Strawman, Appeal to Emotion, Slippery Slope, Loaded Question, Burden of Proof, Bandwagon, Texas Sharpshooter (Cherry Picking), Card Stacking, Glittering Generality, Innuendo
    • Reading: Finish AF for next time




    October 14-18, 2013

    Monday, October 14: A Day (Writing Lab)
    Tuesday, October 15: B Day (Writing Lab)

    • Poem o' the Day: "October" by Don Thompson (no relation)
    • Animal Farm Test: You may use your Study Guide on the test.
      (I hope ya finished it like I told ya to!)
    • To the Lab: The Term Paper Begins Now!
    • Term Paper Assignment: Choose any three texts we have studied this term and write an argumentative essay that illustrates how they all share a particular theme and/or how the the texts support and illustrate each other's themes. Potential topics include the following, but remember that a THEME is a statement about the topic, which must be stated as a complete sentence. It is a general statement about life that the text proves.
    • Language
    • Choice
    • Identity
    • Conformity
    • Rebellion
    • Independence
    • Individualism
    • Saints/Sacrifices/Scapegoats
    • Crime or "sin" (and who defines it)
    • "Ignorance is bliss"
    • Fear
    • Discovery
    • Leadership/Power
    • Technology
    • Argument Basics: Run through this process before you write. We've been talking about these issues all term, so you should be prepared to write a killer argumentative essay! Ready? If so, we can move to the next step.
    • This is the part we didn't get to today:
    • All Together Now: You do as I do!
    • Hook: Attention Getter
    • Background Information to lay the groundwork for the argument
    • Thesis Statement: states a debatable position, represents your belief
    • Reasons (Claim Statements) that you hold the position stated in your thesis -- the more the better!
    • Textual Evidence to support your reasons/claims -- the more the better!
    • WARRANTS explain your thinking, show how your evidence supports your claim -- all evidence must be warranted
    • Counterclaims must be acknowledged and addressed
    • Conclusion
    • Submit a draft to Utah Write by Friday @ 11:59 P.M.

    Wednesday, October 16: A Day


    Thursday, October 17: Fall Recess
    Friday, October 18: Fall Recess

    • No School




    October 21-25, 2013

    Monday, October 21: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "Alone" by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Word Cells o' the Week: -chron-, -pre-, -post-,
      -tact-/-tang-, -terra-/-terr-
    • Neologolusion: Creating New Words
    • Using your lists of prefixes/suffixes and one of the Word Cells we learned today, create a new word and its dictionary definition. Fill in ALL the blanks! Three more to go after today!
    • Writing Notebook: What did you do over Fall Break? Fill the page! (What part of that instruction do many of you not seem to get? Notebooks were scored recently and many of you never fill the page. Fill the page!!!!!)
    • Grammar Punk Rock: Parts of Speech Review
    • Verbs (pretest) -- Verbs are really important!
    • Conjunctions, Prepositions
    • Interjections!
    • Final Animal Farm Assignment
    • Staple to Study Guide & Turn in.


    Tuesday, October 22: A Day
    Wednesday, October 23: B Day


    Thursday, October 24: A Day
    Friday, October 25: B Day

    • Finish Close Reading/Analysis Assignment
    • Share your paraphrases & Summarize the entire poem (one sentence per stanza on back of page).
      • Should be in the third-person – he, him, his – as though you are describing the story to someone else.
      • Should include only the main idea of the stanza, no details.
      • Should be only one or two sentences.
    • Poem o' the Day: "Annabel Lee" (Check this out!)
    • Writing Notebook: Identify something that all of these Edgar Allan Poems have in common: The Raven, "Annabel Lee," "To One in Paradise". Write a page in which you quote one line from each poem to support your claim. WARRANT your evidence by explaining how each quote supports the claim. (If necessary, "translate" each quote to make its meaning clear.)
    • Fill the page!!!!!
    • Extra Credit Options: Nevermore Poem & Storyboard
    • Extra credit is not intended to make up for eight weeks of mediocre work. It is that little extra kick to get you from a B+ to an A-, not from a C- to an A.
    • The amount of extra credit awarded is based on the quality of the product.
    • Extra Credit is due on October 30!
    • Poem o' the Day: "Annabel Lee" (Check this out!)
    • Word Cells o' the Week: -fer-, -port-, -lat-,
      -mort-
    • Neologolusion: Creating New Words
    • Using your lists of prefixes/suffixes and one of the Word Cells we learned today, create a new word and its dictionary definition. Fill in ALL the blanks!
    • Finish the Neologolusion page and return it with all blanks filled in next time!
    • Argument vs. Persuasion vs. Propaganda
    • Homework: Basics of Argumentation: Close read this and note the distinctions between the argumentative essays we will write and oral argumentation. Clarify vocabulary. Thesis = Primary Claim; Reasons = Claims; Support = Textual Evidence; Warrant = Warrant; Counterclaims, etc.
    • If you aren't up to date on StudySync Blasts, catch up this weekend!




    October 28 - November 1, 2013

    Monday, October 28: A Day (Writing Lab)
    Tuesday, October 29: B Day (Writing Lab)


    Wednesday, October 30: A Day (Extra Credit due)
    Thursday, October 31: B Day

    • Poem o' the Day: "Halloween" by Mac Hammond
    • Term Test
    • Writing Notebook: Halloween Horror
    • Can you solve the case and make your argument convincing enough to get the jury to believe you? Fill the page!
    • Raven Parody


    Friday, November 1: Professional Day
    (No School for Students)


    Q: "Did I miss anything?"
    A: Yes.
    ^ Scroll up to find it. ^
    Despite the absence of any support from the school district, I have made every reasonable attempt to ensure that this website is educationally sound and does not contain direct links to inappropriate material.
    2013 M. Wolfman Thompson - All rights reserved.

    *<%^)