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  To see all the weeks in the term, scroll ALL THE WAY DOWN!

October 31-November 4, 2016: Welcome to Term 2!

Monday, October 31: Professional Day (No School for Students) [221]

  • This term you will learn...
  • ...to differentiate informational writing from argumentative writing.
  • ...to practice both.
  • ...how to use commas correctly.
  • ...the academic vocabulary of poetry and drama.
  • ...how to make sense of Shakespeare.
  • ...the elements of tragedy.
  • ...more word cells!
  • ...to close read, annotate, and analyze more complicated text.
  • ...how to acknowledge and rebut a counterclaim.
  • ...to use QAR to generate a claim of your own.
  • ...to read.
  • ...to write.
  • ...to repeat.
  • Word!

Tuesday, November 1: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Like Coins, November" by Elizabeth Klise Von Zerneck
  • Journal #2: Second Term Pre-flection
  • [Get it? PREflection, not REflection: -flect-/-flex- = bend; -re- = back/again; -pre- = before -- "bend before" to look on the coming term.]
  • Last time you wrote a RE-flection (looking back on) on the first term. Today, the second term begins, so you are going to write a PRE-flection (looking before) of your expectations for the next two months. Based on the lessons you learned last term, what are you going to do differently this term? Also, remember that the second term includes two long holiday breaks. (The term ends on January 13, 2017! Think of it!) Do you have any big plans for those breaks? What books will you be reading independently this term? Are you planning to do more homework? Less homework? Are you going to have fun? Are you going to make me keep asking all these questions, or can’t you just write for a page about the future on your own? Honestly! Fill the page!
  • English Binder Check: Everything in its place!
  • (Place all of last term's scored work properly in the binder.)
  • New Hall Passes
  • Halloween Horror: Make your case! Turn it in!


Wednesday, November 2: A Day
Thursday, November 3: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "November for Beginners" by Rita Dove
  • New Hall Passes (for A Day)
  • Journals 3-10: Shakespearean Quotes o' the Day
  • During the time we are studying Romeo and Juliet, the Poem o' the Day will be replaced by the Shakespearean Quotes o' the Day. Your assignment is to copy the quotation exactly as it is written (including punctuation, line spacing, and source), and then paraphrase it and give an example from your own experience that supports the statement. Yes, you still have to fill the page! Here we go:
  • Model: This one is just practice.

    "If all the year were playing holidays,
    To sport would be as tedious as to work."

    -- Henry IV, Part 2: Act II, Scene 1

    Example: I think this quotation means that if your whole life is a vacation (playing holidays), even playing (sport) gets boring (tedious). I see this in my own life at the end of summer, when I've been out of school for more than two months. I actually look forward to going back because I get bored when I don't have anything I HAVE to do. For example, .... (Now fill the page.)....
  • Now for real...
  • Journal #3 -- Shakespearean Quote o' the Day

    "O, it is excellent
    To have a giant's strength,
    but it is tyrannous
    To use it like a giant."

    --Measure for Measure: Act II, Scene 2
  • Word Study
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Word Cells o' the Day: -clud- / -fin-
  • 9th Grade Word Cell o' the Week: -pend- (-pens-)
  • Shakespeare Intro: Miramax Biography
  • Write down observations that will help you answer this question:
    How was Shakespeare's world different than our own?
  • The Assigning of the Passages: Vocabulary of Drama & Passage Analysis
  • It's not homework! Just keep it in your Reading/Literature section.


Friday, November 4: A Day

  • Journal #4
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite."

    --Romeo and Juliet: Act II, Scene 6
  • Shakespeare Intro
  • Shakespeare: Then & Now: Compare Shakespeare's world to our own.
  • Finish the video & notes.
  • Word Study
  • How' bout another Word Cell o' the Day: -con- + variants
    (-co-/-com-/-cor-/-col-)
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk Intro: Let the games begin!
  • Roll the Bones!
  • 1st Period: AP3 adverb music/movies " " -- "I generally prefer happy movies to the academic crap-trap my principal appreciates," said the teacher in the outrageous red shirt.
  • 2nd Period: EB3 preposition , sports -- Baseball is the best sport to watch on TV, but basketball makes my legs tremble in fear.
  • 4th Period: BI3 preposition " " movies/music -- "Big imbeciles like movies with no plot," said the grumbling Obediah.



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

November 7-11, 2016

Monday, November 7: B Day [221]

  • Journal #4
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite."

    --Romeo and Juliet: Act II, Scene 6
  • Shakespeare Intro
  • Shakespeare: Then & Now: Compare Shakespeare's world to our own.
  • Finish the video & notes.
  • Word Study
  • How' bout another Word Cell o' the Day: -con- + variants
    (-co-/-com-/-cor-/-col-)
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk Intro: Let the games begin!
  • Roll the Bones!
  • 5th: OC3 conjunction " " religion -- "Oh, holy Broccoli!" began the invocation, "Protect our congregation from cancerous guacamole and demonic rock!"
  • 6th: UH2 conjunction ; music/movies -- My enthusiasm for funny films and silly songs is authentic; humor makes my mushy mouth chuckle.
  • 7th: UT5 , adverb food/drink -- My Utah intuition tells me that nuts will put you in the outhouse, so don't get too enthusiastic, Justin!
  • 7th: IR3 interjection " " religion -- "Shoot! My religion is weird," said Eric Riley.
  • 8th: TI3 ; music/movies adjective -- Action movies are littered with witty fight scenes; comedies are nifty.


Tuesday, November 8: A Day [Computer Lab 202]
Wednesday, November 9: B Day [Computer Lab 202]

Thursday, November 10: A Day
Friday, November 11: B Day

  • Journal #5
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "Talkers are no good doers: be assured
    We go to use our hands and not our tongues."

    Richard III, Act I, Scene 3
  • Reading/Literature
  • The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet
  • The Prologue Assignment with Close Read
  • Why is Shakespeare Hard? (E-notes may help!)
  • Why are some words given stress marks on the -èd ending
    (banishèd, punishèd, upturnèd)?
  • Why does Shakespeare seem to be apostrophe crazy (fall'st, speak'st, o'er, e'er, 'Tis, etc.)?
  • Audio/Visual: Three Ways to Stage the Prologue
  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk Intro: Let the games begin!
  • Roll the Bones!
  • 1st: OM3 adjective , Shakespeare -- Romeo roomed with his mom and dad, but he longed to be with the lovely Juliet.
  • 2nd: IR3 ? pronoun Shakespeare -- Is my fire for reading Shakespeare ridiculous?
  • 4th: AR5 ? interjection Shakespeare -- Egads, Shakespeare! Art thou the dear heart of my earth?
  • 5th: OD4 adverb , Shakespeare -- Romeo idolized Juliet, so he madly quoted love poems at her odd poodle.
  • 6th:
  • 7th:
  • 8th:
  • YOU HAVE HOMEWORK DUE NEXT TIME!
  • The Paraphrasing of the Passages: Vocabulary of Drama & Passage Analysis
  • Using this web site as a resource, close read your assigned passage of Shakespeare. Your job is to become the expert on your assigned part, so that when we encounter that passage in our study of the play, YOU can help us understand it. Look for end punctuation marks (. ? !) and draw lines to divide the passage into sentences. Circle words you do not recognize, including words that you know but that seem to be used in an unfamiliar way. Paraphrase your passage like you did with a stanza from The Raven last term. (Do not try to "translate" word for word, which will sound awkward and ridiculous.) Express the same thoughts in the language a modern teenager would use. Include all the important details.



Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

November 14-18, 2016

Monday, November 14: A Day [221]
Tuesday, November 15: B Day

  • Homework due now:
  • Staple the Prologue Analysis (pink) to the analysis of your assigned passage from Romeo & Juliet (blue) and turn it in!
  • Word Study
  • 9th Grade Word Cells o' the Week: -aqua- & -hydro- (water)
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Journal #6
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "The harder matched, the greater victory."
    Henry VI, Part 3: Act V, Scene 1
  • Reading/Literature
  • Reading: Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scene 1
    Listen! Do you get it?
  • Assignment: Summarize Scene 1
  • Complete the Figurative Language Analysis + Answer 5 Questions with R.A. responses
  • Passage begins with Romeo saying, "Alas that love, whose view is muffled still..."
  • (One sentence=Restate+Answer)
  • 1. What is the purpose of this passage?
  • 2. How do Shakespeare's word choices influence the meaning or effect?
  • 3. What does the passage tell you about Romeo's personality?
  • 4. How does Romeo's view of love differ from Benvolio's?
  • 5. How would the tone change if there were no figurative language in the passage?
  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk: Roll the Bones!


Wednesday, November 16: A Day
Thursday, November 17: B Day

  • Journal #7
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "Pleasure and action make the hours seem short."
    Othello, Act II, Scene 3
  • Helpful Extra: Glossary of Common Elizabethan Terms
  • Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scenes 2, 3
    Listen & read along....
  • Read: Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scene 4 (Queen Mab) -- Imagery
  • Video: Two Ways Queen Mab Could be Presented
  • Queen Mab Assignment
  • On side 1 of your own paper, answer these questions with R.A.C.E. responses --
  • What does the imagery in the speech tell you about Mercutio?
    • The imagery tells us Mercutio is...
  • How does the imagery change from the beginning to the end of the speech?
    • The imagery changes from ____ to _____...
  • What is the purpose of the speech?
    • The purpose of the speech is...
  • Side 2: Draw (and label, if necessary) Queen Mab.
  • Turn the assignment in!

Friday, November 18: A Day [Computer Lab 202]

  • Today's activity is strictly timed.
  • YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO WORK ON ANY OF THIS AFTER TODAY'S CLASS SESSION!
  • NO, YOU CANNOT WORK ON IT FROM HOME!
  • YOU WILL FINISH IN CLASS TODAY!
  • THIS WILL NOT BE HOMEWORK!
  • Shakespeare: Then & Now -- Part 1: Review & Part 2: Revise
  • Part 1 (30-40 minutes)
    • Log in to your first draft of the essay from last week.
    • Select REQUEST. (Wait patiently while everyone else in the class does the same.)
    • Return to the main interface and review the essays of at least two (2) others in your group.
    • Answer all the questions on the Informational Essay Peer Evaluation Rubric.
    • Turn it in!
  • All the following tools work differently, and many of them are surrounded by annoying advertisements.
  • Read and click carefully; wait patiently to get results.
  • Plagiarism Check #1
  • Plagiarism Check #2
  • Plagiarism Check #3
  • Plagiarism Check #4
  • Part 2 (30-40 minutes)
  • Return to your own essay and read the comments and suggestions of others.
  • Revise; don't just edit.
  • Organize
  • No Bubbas!
  • Resubmit based on the changes you make.
  • Submit a FINAL draft before leaving class.
  • No, you may not work on it after today's class session.
  • SUBMIT A FINAL DRAFT FOR A SCORE!
  • NOW!
  • Just for Fun: Shakespearean Insult Generator & More Shakespearean Insults


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

November 21-25, 2016

Monday, November 21: B Day [Computer Lab 202] [216]

  • Poem o' the Day: "Thanksgiving" by Mac Hammond
  • Today's activity is strictly timed.
  • YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO WORK ON ANY OF THIS AFTER TODAY'S CLASS SESSION!
  • NO, YOU CANNOT WORK ON IT FROM HOME!
  • YOU WILL FINISH IN CLASS TODAY!
  • THIS WILL NOT BE HOMEWORK!
  • Shakespeare: Then & Now -- Part 1: Review & Part 2: Revise
  • Part 1 (30-40 minutes)
    • Log in to your first draft of the essay from last week.
    • Select REQUEST. (Wait patiently while everyone else in the class does the same.)
    • Return to the main interface and review the essays of at least two (2) others in your group.
    • Answer all the questions on the Informational Essay Peer Evaluation Rubric.
    • Turn it in!
  • All the following tools work differently, and many of them are surrounded by annoying advertisements.
  • Read and click carefully; wait patiently to get results.
  • Plagiarism Check #1
  • Plagiarism Check #2
  • Plagiarism Check #3
  • Plagiarism Check #4
  • Part 2 (30-40 minutes)
  • Return to your own essay and read the comments and suggestions of others.
  • Revise; don't just edit.
  • Organize
  • No Bubbas!
  • Resubmit based on the changes you make.
  • Submit a FINAL draft before leaving class.
  • No, you may not work on it after today's class session.
  • SUBMIT A FINAL DRAFT FOR A SCORE!
  • NOW!
  • Just for Fun: Shakespearean Insult Generator & More Shakespearean Insults
  • [No Intervention: Extended 8th Period]

Tuesday, November 22: A Day

  • [No Intervention: Extended 4th Period]
  • Poem o' the Day: "Thanksgiving" by Mac Hammond
  • Journal #8 -- Staple & Submit Journals for Scoring
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "O sir, to willful men
    The injuries that they themselves procure
    Must be their schoolmasters."

    King Lear, Act II, Scene 4
  • Act I: Scene 5 (Romeo sees Juliet for the first time!)
  • Review: Prologue to Capulet's Party
  • Quiz: Romeo and Juliet, Act I
  • Composition
  • Translate Romeo and Juliet's First Meeting into text messages.
  • Happy Thanksgiving!



Wednesday, November 23: Thanksgiving Recess
Thursday, November 24: Thanksgiving Recess
Friday, November 25: Thanksgiving Recess


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

November 28-December 2, 2016

Monday, November 28: B Day [216]

  • Poem o' the Day: "Snow" by David Berman
  • Journal #8 -- Staple & Submit Journals for Scoring
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "O sir, to willful men
    The injuries that they themselves procure
    Must be their schoolmasters."

    King Lear, Act II, Scene 4
  • Act I: Scene 5 (Romeo sees Juliet for the first time!)
  • Review: Prologue to Capulet's Party
  • Quiz: Romeo and Juliet, Act I
  • Composition
  • Translate Romeo and Juliet's First Meeting into text messages.

Tuesday, November 29: A Day
Wednesday, November 30: B Day


Thursday, December 1: A Day
Friday, December 2: B Day

  • Turn in Independent Reading Contract
  • Extra Credit Op: Evening with Elizabeth @ Fairfield
  • Journal #1
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "All things that are
    Are with more spirit chased than enjoyed."

    The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene 6
  • Reading/Literature
  • Balcony Scene Review: Video
  • Romeo & Juliet, Act III, Scene 1 [Crisis/Turning Point]
  • Memorization Assignment: Now it's official!
  • Memorize and practice reciting 12+ lines of Shakespeare's original text from your assigned passage!
  • Start at the beginning of a sentence, and finish at the end of one.
  • Don't stop in the middle of an independent clause just because you have reached the 12-line minimum.
  • Due Date: Two weeks from today!
  • Grammar/Conventions
  • The Apostrophe Rant: "What's in a Name?" (NOT an apostrophe!)
  • Holiday Cards: Apostrophe Catastrophes
  • How to Make Your Last Name Plural
  • Grammar Punk: Roll the Bones!


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

December 5-9, 2016

Monday, December 5: A Day [214]
Tuesday, December 6: B Day

  • Word Study
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Word Cells o' the Week: -oper- / -labor- (labor)
  • Journal #2
  • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
    "Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice."
    Hamlet, Act I, Scene 3
  • Reading/Literature
  • Review: The Death of Mercutio
  • Remember: Poor ol' Mercutio got knocked off, and Romeo is banishèd.
    • Speaking of which,why are some words given stress marks on the -èd ending
      (banishèd, punishèd, upturnèd)?
    • Why does Shakespeare seem to be apostrophe crazy (fall'st, speak'st, o'er, e'er, 'Tis, etc.)?
    • This will help you when you present your Memorized Passages (12+ full lines) on December 15/16!
  • Romeo & Juliet: Act III -- Scene 2 (& Summarize Scene 3)
  • Assignment/Homework: Director's Close Read & Stage Directions for Act III, Scene 4
    • Pretend that YOU are the director of this scene.
    • Write the following on your copy of the text:
    • Mark your confusion & check with the translation to clarify.
    • In the right margin, paraphrase the dialogue.
    • Casting: If you were the director, who would be playing these parts?
    • In the left margin, write specific stage directions for each line of dialogue. (What is the character doing while he speaks his lines?)
    • At the bottom, explain the dramatic irony: What does the audience know that the characters do not?
  • Samples
  • Due next time!


Wednesday, December 7: A Day [Computer Lab 202]
Thursday, December 8: B Day [Computer Lab 202] [P-T Conferences -- 3:45-7:17 P.M.]


Friday, December 9: A Day

  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk: Roll the Bones! (Two sentences about Romeo and Juliet)
  • Reading/Literature
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Review: The Balcony Scene to Capulet's Bargain
  • Table Read: Act III, Scene 5
  • Act IV: To Juliet taking the potion & Paraphrase Important Speeches


Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

December 12-16, 2016

Monday, December 12: B Day [214]

  • Grammar/Conventions
  • Grammar Punk: Roll the Bones! (Two sentences about Romeo and Juliet)
  • Reading/Literature
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Review: The Balcony Scene to Capulet's Bargain
  • Table Read: Act III, Scene 5
  • Act IV: To Juliet taking the potion & Paraphrase Important Speeches


Tuesday, December 13: A Day
Wednesday, December 14: B Day

  • Word Study
  • Second Term Word Cells & Literal Definitions Assignment
  • Word Cells o' the Day: -ex- / -e- / -ec- & -re-
  • Reading/Literature
  • Finish Romeo and Juliet: Act V (Table Read) & Paraphrase Important Speeches
  • Finish Vocabulary of Drama
  • Journal #3: The Year in Review (2016)
  • What were the highlights and lowlights of 2016? Fill a page or two reviewing your year. How have YOU changed?


  • Thursday, December 15: A Day
    Friday, December 16: B Day


    Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

    December 19-24, 2016

    Monday, December 19: A Day [Computer Lab 202] [214]
    Tuesday, December 20: B Day [Computer Lab 202]


    Wednesday, December 21: A Day [Early-out Schedule/Assembly]


    Thursday, December 23: A Day
    Friday, December 24: B Day


    Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

    December 26-30, 2016

    December 26-30 [217] :-(


    Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

    January 2-6, 2017

    Monday, January 2: Last Day of the Break! [213]

    • Poem o' the Day: "Winter Trees" by William Carlos Williams


    Tuesday, January 3: B Day


    Wednesday, January 4: A Day
    Thursday, January 5: B Day

    • Journal #5: "January" Poem Analysis / Poetry Terms
    • Some say poetry is a kind of argument. Do you agree?
    • Introduction to Poetic Epitaphs: Meet Aragog!
    • Voices of Spoon River: Let the Games Begin!
    • Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters is a mash-up of poetry, drama, and fiction. Masters presents a series of first-person monologues as they appear on the gravestones in a Midwestern cemetery in the early 1900s. The characters “speak” their own poetic epitaphs from beyond the grave, confessing the true motivations of their lives and uncovering many of the mysteries and secrets of the town. The voices of the former residents of Spoon River often appear in clusters that present all sides of a story that would be incomplete if presented by only a single voice. Each epitaph may be appreciated for its own poetic merits, but by cross-referencing them with each other, the careful reader learns elements of the underlying (get it?) narrative that even the characters themselves do not understand.
    • Welcome to Spoon River: Introduction (22 min.)
    • Travel back a century in time by talking to some of the the sleepers on The Hill: Elsa Wertman, Hamilton Greene, Richard Bone, Rutherford McDowell, Hortense Robbins, Anne Rutledge, Hannah Armstrong, Knowlt Hoheimer
    • Assignment: Tone and Mood


    Friday, January 6: A Day

    • Turn in completed Term 2 Word Cells Assignment!
    • Journal #6: The End of the Beginning -- Go back in your collection of scored journals and read and reflect on these entries: Oct. 10/11; Oct 26/27; and Oct. 28/Nov. 1. What do you know now that you wish you had known then? Did your pre-flection/goalsetting pay off? The end (of the semester) is near. Are you ready? Why or why not? Is it the same feeling you always have at the end of the term, or is this one more hopeful? Less hopeful? When you look back on this entry later, what do you hope you will be able to say? Fill the page.
    • (Staple/Turn in Journals)
    • Reading/Literature & Composition: The Rhodes Affair
    • Read each of these epitaphs carefully: Eugene Carman, Clarence Fawcett, Mrs. George Reece, Jack McGuire, Nicholas Bindle, Henry Phipps, Ralph Rhodes, Thomas Rhodes
    • Group Work: Describe each character and explain what part the character played in "The Rhodes Affair."
    • Include the voice (tone) of the character as well as the feeling (mood) it creates in the reader: How does the character feel about his/her life? How do you feel about the character?
    • Sample: Eugene Carman is bitter and resentful. For 14 years he worked long hours for little pay in a store owned by Thomas Rhodes. Because Rhodes was influential in the church, Carman had to attend services twice a week to keep up appearances. Overcome by rage and resentment for spending so much of his life as "Rhodes' slave," he starts screaming at his reflection, which causes him to have a brain aneurysm and die. I feel sorry for Eugene Carman because he believed he was powerless; he felt that he was controlled by Thomas Rhodes. Maybe he really was.
    • Individual Work [Finish as Homework]: Using textual evidence from the epitaphs in the cycle of epitaphs called The Rhodes Affair," write a one-page character sketch of Thomas Rhodes. What kind of a man was he, and what influence did he have on the town of Spoon River? Support your statements with quotes from the various epitaphs of other townspeople.


    Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions

    January 9-13, 2016

    Monday, January 9: B Day [210]

    • Turn in completed Term 2 Word Cells Assignment!
    • Journal #6: The End of the Beginning -- Go back in your collection of scored journals and read and reflect on these entries: Oct. 10/11; Oct 26/27; and Oct. 28/Nov. 1. What do you know now that you wish you had known then? Did your pre-flection/goalsetting pay off? The end (of the semester) is near. Are you ready? Why or why not? Is it the same feeling you always have at the end of the term, or is this one more hopeful? Less hopeful? When you look back on this entry later, what do you hope you will be able to say? Fill the page.
    • (Staple/Turn in Journals)
    • Reading/Literature & Composition: The Rhodes Affair
    • Read each of these epitaphs carefully: Eugene Carman, Clarence Fawcett, Mrs. George Reece, Jack McGuire, Nicholas Bindle, Henry Phipps, Ralph Rhodes, Thomas Rhodes
    • Group Work: Describe each character and explain what part the character played in "The Rhodes Affair."
    • Include the voice (tone) of the character as well as the feeling (mood) it creates in the reader: How does the character feel about his/her life? How do you feel about the character?
    • Sample: Eugene Carman is bitter and resentful. For 14 years he worked long hours for little pay in a store owned by Thomas Rhodes. Because Rhodes was influential in the church, Carman had to attend services twice a week to keep up appearances. Overcome by rage and resentment for spending so much of his life as "Rhodes' slave," he starts screaming at his reflection, which causes him to have a brain aneurysm and die. I feel sorry for Eugene Carman because he believed he was powerless; he felt that he was controlled by Thomas Rhodes. Maybe he really was.
    • Individual Work [Finish as Homework]: Using textual evidence from the epitaphs in the cycle of epitaphs called The Rhodes Affair," write a one-page character sketch of Thomas Rhodes. What kind of a man was he, and what influence did he have on the town of Spoon River? Support your statements with quotes from the various epitaphs of other townspeople.


    Tuesday, January 10: A Day
    Wednesday, January 11: B Day

    • Poems o' the Day: "The End" by Mark Strand & "George Gray" by Edgar Lee Masters
    • Compare these poems using a Venn Diagram
    • On a separate sheet of paper, write a one-paragraph comparison of "George Gray" and "The End". Your paragraph will be scored on two things: Writing Quality and Content Understanding.
    • Return scored journals and word cells. Keep them in the appropriate sections of your English Binder! Most of you will be in a different class period next week, so you need the English Binder in proper order for the switch!
    • Small Group Activity: With your group, use the book to answer the questions about your assigned character on the Spoon River Review.
    • Familiarize yourself with the relationships between the characters in these epitaphs:
    • Judge Somers & Chase Henry
    • Editor Whedon & Carl Hamblin
    • The Town Marshal & Jack McGuire
    • Ollie McGee & Fletcher McGee
    • Cooney Potter & Fiddler Jones
    • Informational Preview: Interactive Fiction (Zork, anyone?)


    Thursday, January 12: A Day [Computer Lab 202]
    Friday, January 13: B Day [Computer Lab 202]
    Last Day of the Semester

    • Voices of Spoon River
    • Keep your packet in order!
    • Use the map!
    • Don't forget to save your game!
    • See you next semester!


    Sections of English Binder: Journal, Word Study, Composition, Reading/Literature, Grammar/Conventions
    Q: "Did I miss anything?"
    A: Yes.
    ^ Scroll up to find it. ^

    Despite the absence of any support from the school district, I have made every reasonable attempt to ensure that this website is educationally sound and does not contain direct links to inappropriate material.
    2017 M. Wolfman Thompson - All rights reserved.

    *<%^)