Wink...Wink! Daily Assignments Title Graphic
Grades/Homework
Study Sync
Utah Write
Goodreads
Word Cells
To see the entire term, scroll ALL THE WAY DOWN!

September 3-7, 2012: Welcome Back!
Term 1: "Why?" and "How to..."

Monday, September 3: Labor Day

  • No School: Labor Day Holiday
  • This term you will learn WHY...
  • ...literacy matters. (Communication)
  • ...people read and write outside of school. (Purpose)
  • This term you will learn HOW TO...
  • ...ask questions.
  • ...have a conversation.
  • ...craft an argument.
  • ...write an argumentative essay.
  • ...close read and annotate text.
  • ...figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word.
  • ...StudySync.
  • ...identify the parts of speech (for real this time)!
  • ...accept responsibility.
  • ...work in a group.
  • ...analyze the elements of fiction in various texts.
  • ...find and clearly state a theme.


Tuesday, September 4: A Day
Wednesday, September 5: B Day


Thursday, September 6: A Day (Computer Lab 202)
Friday, September 7: B Day (Computer Lab 202)



September 10-14, 2012

Monday, September 10: A Day
Tuesday, September 11: B Day

  • Reading Quiz: F451 (to p. 53) -- Turn in QAR Questions for Quiz
  • Discussion: Share the Good Parts
  • Writing Notebook: The Finer Details
    Copy this quotation on the first page of your WN:
    "You learn to write by writing. The only way to learn to write is to force yourself to produce a certain number of words on a regular basis."
    --William Zinsser
Writing Notebook Guidelines:
Copy these under the quote on the first page.
  • Date every entry and assignment.
  • Skip only one or two lines between entries. Do not put each entry on a separate page!
  • Never remove any pages from your writing notebook, even after they have been scored.
  • Writing Notebooks are to remain in the classroom at all times!


Wednesday, September 12: A Day
Thursday, September 13: B Day


Friday, September 14: A Day



September 17-21, 2012

Monday, September 17: B Day


Tuesday, September 18: A Day
Wednesday, September 19: B Day


Thursday, September 20: A Day (Computer Lab 202)
Friday, September 21: B Day (Computer Lab 202)

  • Poem o' the Day: "Paradoxes and Oxymorons" by John Ashberry
  • SRI: Reading Test
  • Study Sync Assignment: See what your classmates said about your F451 writing and conisder how you would improve it if you were going to do another draft.
  • Complete the "blasts" assigned since last time; rate some others; see how you get rated.
  • Word Cells (AKA Morphemes)
  • Neologolusion: Creating New Words & Making Sense of Unfamiliar Ones. Using your lists of prefixes/suffixes and the Word Cells we've learned so far, create a new word and its and its dictionary definition. Post a correctly written dictionary entry under the appropriate thread on the Falcon Forum.
  • Step-by-Step Instructions to Join the Falcon Forum
    (It might take a few hours for your registration to clear, so don't put this off until the last minute!)
  • The F451 Objective Test (multiple-choice) will be next time! Finish the book!



September 24-28, 2012

Monday, September 24: A Day
Tuesday, September 25: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Alone" by Edgar Allan Poe
  • Turn in F451 books and take content test.
  • Literary Element Worksheet: Complete this as we read Fahrenheit 451. (Didja?)
  • Review Elements of Fiction: Let's review with these flashcards!
  • Routine #3: Grammar Punk (POS)
  • Grammar Punk Rock: Parts of Speech Review -- Nouns & Pronouns
  • Kinds of Nouns: common, proper, concrete, abstract, countable, collective, compound, possessive, and gerunds
  • Kinds of Pronouns: personal, reflexive, demonstrative, interogative, indefinite, and possessive
    (Common Pronoun Problems)
  • Writing Notebook: Write a review of Fahrenheit 451. Keep in mind that a review is NOT a summary of the story. It is your evaluation of the novel as a work of literature, and it is written as an ARGUMENT OF JUDGMENT. Having read the novel and observed the elements that you were moved by and those you were not moved by, you get to be the judge...but this is not just a statement of your opinion. Your opinion is only valid if it is an informed one, backed by logical evidence and reasoned explanation, so after considering all the elements of the novel that you have observed over the past three weeks, make a CLAIM that you support with EVIDENCE from the text. WARRANT your evidence by explaining clearly how it supports your claim. Obviously, this is informal (this time), so use this in-class opportunity to practice a kind of writing that you will be expected to do a lot more of in the coming years.
  • Distribute Anthem & Continue Reading Schedule -- Read Section I for next time! (It's not long.)
  • Are you one of the 47% that hasn't yet posted your new word and its dictionary definition to the Falcon Forum? If so, what gives? At least one computer lab is open every Intervention period, and most of you could even do it from home.
  • Question that came up today: "Are we supposed to be reading other books, on our own, besides the ones you assign in class?" Answer: You don't have to read anything besides what I assign to get points in the class, but I encourage you to read as much as you want of whatever you want.



Wednesday, September 26: A Day
Thursday, September 27: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley
  • Check out these videos: 1, 2, 3, 4
  • Proper/Common Nouns & Pronoun Review: Were you listening last time? Can you see why an understanding of pronouns is important to understanding Anthem? What about the way the narrator uses proper nouns: Council of Vocations, Home of Infants/Students/Useless, Temple of the World Council, Life Mandate, Hymn of Brotherhood/Equality/Collective Spirit, Transgression of Preference, Unmentionable Times? What does this indicate?
  • Your Anthem Name:
  • Writing Notebook: Describe the society in which Anthem is set. Some areas to consider are the political structure, degree of technology, social relationships, quality of life, and education. Would you want to live in this society? Explain why or why not.
  • Other issues to consider/discuss:
  • What is an anthem? What might this title suggest about the story?
  • What do the names of the characters (Equality 7-2521, International 4-8818, Union 5-3992) suggest about the society of Anthem?
  • When does this novel take place — in the past, the present, or the future? How do you know?
  • "It is a sin to write this." Why? What is considered sinful in this society?
  • Consider what goes on in...
  • ...the Home of Infants/Students/Useless.
  • ...the Council of Vocations.
  • ...the Home of the Street Sweepers. (Why was Equality 7-2521 assigned to that vocation?)
  • AoW (Close Reading and Annotation): Language of Leadership
  • Anthem: Continue Reading Schedule
  • Stay up-to-date on those weekly blasts on StudySync!


Friday, September 28: A Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Ego" by Denise Duhamel
  • Turn in AoW Close Reading & Write a one-page reflection in Writing Notebook
    (How does this article relate to the literary themes we have been talking about?)
  • Falcon Forum: Anthem Discussion Question -- due October 3!
  • Compare Fahrenheit 451 to Anthem -- What are some common elements and themes? What are the differences? What do the differences say about the authors' beliefs regarding technology, cooperation, individuality?
  • Word Cells: Add these to your growing list!
  • Word Cells o' the Day: -graph- (-gram-) & -scrib-/-script- & -dict-
    • 9th Grade Weekly Word Cells: -tact-/-tang- & -terra-/-terr-
  • Trip or Slip? The Basics of Argumentation
  • In-class Activity
  • Anthem: Continue Reading Schedule (to page 77)
  • Stay up-to-date on those weekly blasts on StudySync!
  • Enrichment: Review Elements of Fiction: Here are some interactive excercises! And flashcards!



October 1-5, 2012

Monday, October 1: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Ego" by Denise Duhamel
  • Turn in AoW Close Reading & Write a one-page reflection in Writing Notebook
    (How does this article relate to the literary themes we have been talking about?)
  • Falcon Forum: Anthem Discussion Question -- due October 3!
  • Compare Fahrenheit 451 to Anthem -- What are some common elements and themes? What are the differences? What do the differences say about the authors' beliefs regarding technology, cooperation, individuality?
  • Word Cells: Add these to your growing list!
  • Word Cells o' the Day: -graph- (-gram-) & -scrib-/-script- & -dict-
    • 9th Grade Weekly Word Cells: -tact-/-tang- & -terra-/-terr-
  • Trip or Slip? The Basics of Argumentation
  • In-class Activity
  • Anthem: Continue Reading Schedule (to page 77)
  • Stay up-to-date on those weekly blasts on StudySync!
  • Enrichment: Review Elements of Fiction: Here are some interactive excercises! And flashcards!


Tuesday, October 2: A Day
Wednesday, October 3: B Day (PT Conferences, 3:45-7:15 P.M.)

  • Writing Notebook: Write the dialogue that would/will take place between your parents and me if/when they come to parent-teacher conferences.
  • Poem o' the Day: "Idea XIV" by Michael Drayton
  • Handing Back of Many Things: Keep them all! (You will be able to use them as "evidence" in your term paper.)
    • A Word on Close Reading & Annotation: Examples to Emulate
    • "Interesting," "Wow!" and "I disagree" do not qualify as thoughtful commentary.
    • Underlining and/or highlighting are meaningless if you don't write WHY they are significant in the margins.
    • Lots of unexplained question marks don't provide "evidence of a close reading."
    • Cute clouds and artwork are nice...but they do not count as thoughtful commentary.
    • Speculating on whether or not Thompson is actually reading your comments does not illustrate that you read the article carefully.
    • Again, follow the examples.
  • Literary Element Worksheet: Complete this as we finish Anthem.
    (Yes, another one! And it is due next Monday/Tuesday when you turn in the Anthem books.)
  • Routine #3: Grammar Punk (POS)
  • Grammar Punk Rock: Parts of Speech Review: Modifiers
  • Adjectives (What do they modify? What questions do they answer?)
  • Adjectives Review
  • Adverbs (What do they modify? What questions do they answer?)
  • Adverbs Review
  • Beware: Misplaced Modifiers (video)
  • Argument Intro & How It Differs from Persuasion and Propaganda
  • Try Another Case: Lunchroom Murder (Critical Thinking in Search of Truth)
  • ***Homework (due next time!): Write your argument. Use the outline form on the back of the handout to get your thoughts in order, and present your case as you would to a jury.
    Here's a model based on the first case we read.
  • Anthem: Continue Reading Schedule (through Section X)
  • Stay up-to-date on those weekly blasts on StudySync!


Thursday, October 4: A Day (PT Conferences, 3:45-7:15 P.M.)
Friday, October 5: B Day

  • Turn in your written argument about the solution to the case of the Lunchroom Murder.
  • Poem o' the Day: "Immortality" by Lisel Mueller
  • Misplaced Modifiers: Exercise #1
  • Finish reading Anthem.
  • Common Topics: Turning Them Into Theme Statements
  • The following topics play a part in all the literature we will read this term: Language, Choice, Identity, Conformity/Rebellion, Independence/Individualism vs. The "Collective", Saints/Sacrifices/Scapegoats, "Sin" and Crime (and who defines it), "Ignorance is bliss," Fear, Discovery, Leadership/Power, Technology
  • Writing Notebook: Turn at least five of these topics into THEME STATEMENTS that are illustrated by the reading we are doing for this class. Review the Literary Elements Handout to see how a theme should be stated.
  • AoW (Close Reading): The Declaration of Independence
    (The ones like these get the best scores: rich, thoughtful commentary. Remember what it means to close read and annotate.)
  • Homework: Finish Anthem and Literary Element Worksheet & Close Reading



October 8-12, 2012

Monday, October 8: A Day
Tuesday, October 9: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Questionnaire" by Charles Bernstein
  • Writing Notebook: If you have been responding to all the Blasts on StudySync (like you are supposed to be doing every week!), then you have been thinking about the presidential election, and you certainly have heard plenty of opinions on both candidates. What's your take and where did it come from? Have you formed your own political opinions, or do you just tend to go along with whatever your friends and family say? (100+)
  • Misplaced Modifiers: Exercise #2
  • Routine #2: Word Cells
    • Word Cells o' the Day: -chron- / -pre- / -post-
    • 9th Grade Weekly Word Cell: -aster-/-astr- (star)
  • Review/Turn in the AoW (Close Reading): The Declaration of Independence
  • (Is Anthem Equality 7-2521's declaration of independence?)
  • Animal Farm
    Assign Books & Intro
  • Political Systems: When you read Animal Farm and Anthem, it helps to have a basic understanding of various systems of leadership. The problem is that all such systems are open to debate, often strident debate completely free of facts or supporting evidence. Any of the enrichment links posted here can be argued and debated in rational terms, and they are here only to inspire critical thought and discussion, not to convince you that a certain philosophy is the "correct" one. Whatever you choose to believe, know why!
  • Read Section I aloud
  • Continue Reading Schedule (Section II for next time)...
  • ...and fill in the study guide as you read.


Wednesday, October 10: A Day (Computer Lab)
Thursday, October 11: B Day (Computer Lab)


Friday, October 12: A Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Where I'm From" by George Ella Lyon
    (See/Hear other examples....)
  • Turn your outline (from the first day of school) into a non-literal poem about yourself . Turn in today!
  • AoW: "Doublespeak" by William Lutz (Close Reading & Group Activity)
  • Euphemism, Jargon, Gobbledegook, Inflated Language, Political Correctness, Circumlocutions, Oxymorons
  • Writing Notebook: Doublespeak notes
  • Continue Reading Schedule & Study Guide (V & VI for next time)
  • Homework: Falcon Forum discussion question due next week
  • Misplaced Modifiers: Exercise #4 & Exercise #5
  • StudySync: You have four days (Oct. 13-17) to review 8 of your classmates' Animal Farm responses. There is a computer lab open for StudySync work every Intervention day, but you are welcome to complete these reviews from home.



October 15-19, 2012

Monday, October 15: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Where I'm From" by George Ella Lyon
    (See/Hear other examples....)
  • Turn your outline (from the first day of school) into a non-literal poem about yourself . Turn in today!
  • AoW: "Doublespeak" by William Lutz (Close Reading & Group Activity)
  • Euphemism, Jargon, Gobbledegook, Inflated Language, Political Correctness, Circumlocutions, Oxymorons
  • Writing Notebook: Doublespeak notes
  • Continue Reading Schedule & Study Guide (V & VI for next time)
  • Homework: Falcon Forum discussion question due next week
  • Misplaced Modifiers: Exercise #4 & Exercise #5
  • StudySync: You have four days (Oct. 13-17) to review 8 of your classmates' Animal Farm responses. There is a computer lab open for StudySync work every Intervention day, but you are welcome to complete these reviews from home.

Tuesday, October 16: A Day
Wednesday, October 17: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Won't Get Fooled Again" (as it applies to Animal Farm)
  • Writing Notebook: (Refer to your Doublespeak Notes notes from last time.) How is language used to control the sheep? Are you a sheep? Discuss the ways language is used to deceive. (Include examples if you know some.)
  • Bread: The Root of All Evil (See how deceptive language can be?)
  • Word Cells
    • Word Cells o' the Day: -bene- / -mal- / -phil-
    • Weekly Word Cell: -rupt-
  • Quiz on Misplaced Modifiers
  • Homework: StudySync Assignment (due by today!)
  • Davis Reads

Thursday, October 18: Fall Recess
Friday, October 19: Fall Recess

  • No School
  • Need Extra Credit? Here are a few ideas:
  • Reflections Contest: "The Magic of a Moment"
    (Enter the Literature Catetgory!)
  • Martin Luther King Speech Contest: Reflect on the Legacy of Dr. King (using his "I Have a Dream" Speech or any of his letters as a guide), and reflect on what YOU can do to make a positive difference in achieving his dream. Speeches must be presented orally, from memory, and they have to be at least one minute long, but no more than three minutes. See me for more details.
  • Anthem Essay Contest: Write the Essay and turn it in to me. I will enter it for you.





October 22-26, 2012

Monday, October 22: A Day (Counselors)
Tuesday, October 23: B Day (Counselors)

  • Counselors: SEOP Sign-up
  • New Seats
  • Writing Notebook: How was your long weekend? What did you do?
  • Poem o' the Day: "A Letter in October" by Ted Kooser
  • Routine #3: Grammar Punk (POS)
  • Grammar Punk Rock: Parts of Speech Review: Interjections & Mr. Morton
  • Due by Friday: StudySync/Utah Write Animal Farm Writing Assignment: Using the reviews your classmates did of your Animal Farm essay on StudySync, write a final draft and enter it in Utah Write for scoring. (If you were here last year, your Utah Write login is the same: usually 16FLAST. If you were not here last year, your login is the same as your login to the school system.) Once logged in, select Honors English 2012 and the Animal Farm question. Paste your final draft into the box and submit for scoring.
  • Logical Fallacies: Beware! (Here's a larger list.) There are two reasons I think it is important for you to know about logical fallacies: 1) So you don't use them in writing your own arguments; 2) So you aren't fooled by others who use them on you.
  • Just what is an argument, anyway?
  • (How is it different than persuasion & propaganda?)
  • Writing Notebook: Next week you will have to write a term paper that deals with many of the themes and language issues we addressed during this term. Your paper will be a well-supported and warranted ARGUMENT that lays out the evidence and explanations needed to support your claim. We've looked at a lot of material about this kind of argumentation, but what is your take? What is ARGUMENT as the term is used in this class? How is it different than your earlier conception of the word? What does this kind of argument require of you? How will you set out to make your argument in your paper next week? Have you chosen (through reading and observation) a theme to address? Discuss.
  • Homework: Read Section IX of Animal Farm & Update Study Guide
  • Still lookin' for extra credit?


Wednesday, October 24: A Day (No computers)
Thursday, October 25: B Day (No computers)

  • Poem o' the Day: "October" by Bobbi Katz
  • Finish Animal Farm & Study Guide
  • Word Cells o' the Day: -fer- / -port- / -lat-
  • Word Cell o' the Week: -mort- (death)
  • Writing Notebook: Word Cell Term Review -- Write a podcast of your own for one of the word cells we have covered so far. These will appear on the Term Test next week! Study them!
  • : -log- / -ology
  • -form- / -morph-
  • -graph- (-gram-) / -dict-
  • -chron- / -pre- / -post-
  • -bene- / -mal- / -phil-
  • -fer- / -port- / -lat-
  • Textbook References
  • MPT p. 42 -- derivation (etymology)
  • p. 182 -- word maps
  • p. 192 -- useful roots (word bank activity)
  • p. 373 -- Word Ancestors (word maps)
  • p. 515 -- Prefixes and Root Words
  • p. 916 -- The History of English
  • p. 1042-3 -- Roots, Prefixes, Suffixes
  • Homework: StudySync/Utah Write Animal Farm Writing Assignment: Using the reviews your classmates did of your Animal Farm essay on StudySync, write a final draft and enter it in Utah Write for scoring. (If you were here last year, your Utah Write login is the same: usually 16FLAST. If you were not here last year, your login is the same as your login to the school system.) Once logged in, select Honors English 2012 and the Animal Farm question. Paste your final draft into the box and submit for scoring.


Friday, October 26: A Day (Writing Lab)

  • Poem o' the Day: "Annabel Lee" (Check this out!)
  • THE TERM PAPER: Write an essay of argumentation in which you explain how a particular theme is developed in several of the texts we studied this term. Use warranted evidence (quotes from the texts and your explanations of how they support the theme you have identified) to develop your paper. The more specific examples you have, the better.
  • Start by reviewing what we've studied this term. (Scroll down.)
  • Here are the novels: F451, Anthem, Animal Farm
  • Use this outline format to help you develop your argument.
  • Identify the common elements, topics, and ideas. (We've been talking about this in class for a while now.)
  • Discover a theme that applies to all the works in some way: A theme is simply a statement about the way things are. A theme is not a moral or a lesson. It does notexpress right or wrong, and it does not include should/shouldn’t. A theme does not cast judgment; it is just a simple truth about life. Themes are universal ideas that apply to everyone, not just the characters in the book, sodon’t name specifics from the book when you state the theme.
  • Remember that you are writing a logical analysis and argument in which you use specific, warranted evidence from the texts to prove that the texts illustrate the theme you have selected. This type of writing is more formal and structured than anything you have done in your Writing Notebook, and you should avoid using the first-person (I, me, we, us).




October 29 - November 2, 2012

Monday, October 29: B Day (Writing Lab)

  • Poem o' the Day: "Annabel Lee" (Check this out!)
  • THE TERM PAPER: Write an essay of argumentation in which you explain how a particular theme is developed in several of the texts we studied this term. Use warranted evidence (quotes from the texts and your explanations of how they support the theme you have identified) to develop your paper. The more specific examples you have, the better.
  • Start by reviewing what we've studied this term. (Scroll down.)
  • Here are the novels: F451, Anthem, Animal Farm
  • Use this outline format to help you develop your argument.
  • Identify the common elements, topics, and ideas. (We've been talking about this in class for a while now.)
  • Discover a theme that applies to all the works in some way: A theme is simply a statement about the way things are. A theme is not a moral or a lesson. It does notexpress right or wrong, and it does not include should/shouldn’t. A theme does not cast judgment; it is just a simple truth about life. Themes are universal ideas that apply to everyone, not just the characters in the book, sodon’t name specifics from the book when you state the theme.
  • Remember that you are writing a logical analysis and argument in which you use specific, warranted evidence from the texts to prove that the texts illustrate the theme you have selected. This type of writing is more formal and structured than anything you have done in your Writing Notebook, and you should avoid using the first-person (I, me, we, us).



Tuesday, October 30: A Day
Wednesday, October 31: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "Halloween" by Mac Hammond
  • Finish Term Papers & Submit
  • Turn in all books from first term.
  • Halloween Mystery: Solve the case and write up your argument.
  • Routine #3: Grammar Punk (POS Review) -- Finish it! You should KNOW the parts of speech for the term test next time! Next term we play Grammar Punk! (For the Last Time: What is a Sentence?)


Thursday, November 1: A Day
Friday, November 2: B Day

  • Poem o' the Day: "November for Beginners" by Rita Dove
  • Extra Credit: Turn it in now!
  • Term Test: So, what did you really learn this term?
  • Halloween Horror: Make your case (in writing). Turn it in!
    (The correct answer will be posted on the website this weekend.)
  • Writing Notebook: Term-End Reflection: The first term is over. How did it go? Look back and discuss. Explain. Elaborate. Pontificate. (100+)
  • A Special Poem for Mrs. Corry, from her Honors Students



"Did I miss anything?" This is the most annoying question students who have been absent can ask. My usual sarcastic reply is something like this: "Oh, heck no! We knew you were gone, so we just sat around all day and looked at each other. You don't really think I'm going to assign work on a day you're not here, do you?" So, in order to keep everyone (students and their parents) apprised of what exactly is going on each day in class, I am going to put it here. Check back often!

Despite the absence of any support from the school district, I have made every reasonable attempt to insure that this website is educationally sound and does not contain direct links to inappropriate material.
2012 M. Wolfman Thompson - All rights reserved.

*<%^)