Wink...Wink! Thompson's Page Title Graphic
E-Mail Me
Classroom Calendar
Online Textbook

Reading List
ReadingPractice Contract
9th Grade Links
Honors English

Fairfield Writing Guide

English Links

Check Grades

Fairfield Home

Davis School District

January 18-22, 2010: Third Term Begins

Monday, January 18

  • Human Rights Day
  • Thank you, Dr. King!
    (And not just for the day off!)

Tuesday, January 19

  • No School for Students
  • Lots of Meetings for Teachers :-(

Wednesday, January 20: A Day
Thursday, January 21: B Day

  • New Classes/New Seats
  • Hall Passes/Reading Practice Contracts (Due February 1)
  • Copy "The Road Not Taken" (MPT p. 315) into your journal.
  • Journal #1: You are now standing at the place where two roads diverge. Which road are you planning to follow? Explain your metaphors and symbols.
  • (We've already started the) Term Writing Assignment: Persuasive Writing
  • Now let's continue....
    • Persuasive Writing Pre-test: Score/Turn in
    • "The Right to Privacy": Write a response to Betsy Hart. Maintain appropriate voice, a clear sense of purpose, and effective word choice for this audience.
  • "It's Not Just a Phase" & Dear Abby: Conversation About Teens & Adults
  • Where are you on the continuum?
    Completely Disagree -- Somewhat Disagree -- Neutral -- Somewhat Agree -- Completely Agree
  • Bad Signs: Have you seen this one? Wow!

Friday, January 22: A Day

  • Computer Lab
  1. Get Planning the Draft & Annotated Rough Draft of Persuasive Papers from Mr. T. (You should have turned them in last week.)
  2. Refer to Suggestion to Fix Common Problems in Persuasive Drafts. (This is what we used last week to make the annotations on the first draft.)
  3. Write an improved second draft, making significant changes to the first one, using the annotations and examples from last week. But don't print it yet!
  4. Create Works Cited using Citation Maker or Citation Machine.
  5. Paste the finished citations onto the bottom of your draft. It doesn't have to be a separate page; put it just a few lines below where the writing ends. It needs to be titled "Works Cited." But still don't print!
  6. Compare your draft to the Editor's Checklist.
  7. If you can answer "yes" to all the questions, then print it!
  8. Staple best draft on top, then first draft, then planning the draft.
  9. Turn in!
  • More Bad Signs (apostrophes again!) right under our noses, brought you by Bekah...who desperately needed extra credit...and who still talks way too much in class.


January 25-29, 2010

Monday, January 25: B Day

  • Computer Lab
  1. Get Planning the Draft & Annotated Rough Draft of Persuasive Papers from Mr. T. (You should have turned them in last week.)
  2. Refer to Suggestion to Fix Common Problems in Persuasive Drafts. (This is what we used last week to make the annotations on the first draft.)
  3. Write an improved second draft, making significant changes to the first one, using the annotations and examples from last week. But don't print it yet!
  4. Create Works Cited using Citation Maker or Citation Machine.
  5. Paste the finished citations onto the bottom of your draft. It doesn't have to be a separate page; put it just a few lines below where the writing ends. It needs to be titled "Works Cited." But still don't print!
  6. Compare your draft to the Editor's Checklist.
  7. If you can answer "yes" to all the questions, then print it!
  8. Staple best draft on top, then first draft, then planning the draft.
  9. Turn in!
  • More Bad Signs (apostrophes again!) right under our noses, brought to you by Bekah...who desperately needed extra credit...and who still talks way too much in class.

Tuesday, January 26: A Day
Wednesday, January 27: B Day

  • Journal #2: What do you think of your new surroundings, new classes, and new classmates? And how 'bout that seating chart, eh? Are you ready to begin the last half of your last year of junior high school? What, if any, changes are you planning to make this semester? (100+)
  • Grammar Punk Meets Fumblerules: Writing Notebook (in the back)
  • TV Survey (In Writing Notebook)
  • Persuasive Essay: "The Trouble With Television"
  • Writing Notebook: Analyze the argument and discuss your own thoughts on television in a letter to Robert MacNeil.
  • Word Cells List #6: CRT Review List & Vocab. Practice (Quiz Feb. 3/4)


Thursday, January 28: A Day
Friday, January 29: B Day (Region Swim Meet)*

  • Intro to The Bard: Shakespeare in the Classroom (Video)
  • Shakespeare's World vs. Our Own: Group Assignment (Work dilligently!)
  • Articles: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9
    • Small groups: Read/Discuss the articles about Shakespeare's world and complete the handout. (Each member of the group must contribute.)
      • Summary: Make sure to include the main points; no specifics.
      • Vocabulary: Use a dictionary if necessary.
      • Inference: The article will not explicitly state how Shakespeare's world was different, but you should be able to draw conclusions based on what you read. For example, the fact that we are not even sure of the day when Shakespeare was born indicates that there was no effective system of recordkeeping back then...and probably no computer databases.
      • Picture: Have your best artist draw; the rest of the group can contribute ideas.
    • The Point: Part of the reason modern readers consider Shakespeare boring and/or incomprehensible (besides the fact that most of them have the critical thinking skills of third graders) is because Shakespeare's plays and language are the product of a world that is nothing like ours. His characters, however, illustrate that while the world is very different now, people are still much the same. We have the same emotions, flaws, and passions as people have had throughout history. By understanding a little about the time and place in which the plays were written, it can help modern readers get past all the unfamiliar stuff and enjoy the human stories that we can all relate to.



February 1-5, 2010

Monday, February 1: A Day
Tuesday, February 2: B Day

  • Reading Practice Contracts due Today!
  • Computer Lab (1st half of period)
  • Persuasive Essay: Term Writing Assignment
    • Return typed drafts of Persuasive Essays & Editor's Checklist
    • Read-around Groups: Be critical but not mean!
    • Take your typed draft to a parent or trusted adult and ask that person to read your essay and fill out the checklist. (Note: You will not be graded on how many "yes" responses you receive, so don't encourage your parents to lie in order to get you a better grade. If you have not met one of the requirements, you want your evaluator to let you know so that you can fix the problem before you do a final draft).
    • Based on the feedback you receive, create a "perfect" final draft that meets all the requirements. Turn that draft in on or before February 9/10.
  • Journal #3 -- Copy and discuss these quotes:

    "If all the year were playing holidays,
    To sport would be as tedious as to work."

    -- Henry IV, Part 2: Act II, Scene 1

    "O, it is excellent
    To have a giant's strength,
    but it is tyrannous
    To use it like a giant."

    --Measure for Measure: Act II, Scene 2


Wednesday, February 3: A Day
Thursday, February 4: B Day


Friday, February 5: A Day

  • Review List: Gigantic All-Inclusive Word "Cells" List
    (Test on 100+ cells on February 18/19)
  • Fumblerule #3: Reserve the apostrophe for it's proper use and omit it when its not needed.
  • Journal #5 -- Copy and discuss this quote:
    "Talkers are no good doers: be assured
    We go to use our hands and not our tongues."
    Richard III, Act I, Scene 3
  • Shakespeare Packets: Do Not Lose Them!
  • Romeo and Juliet: Listen, follow along, see how much of the study guide you can answer
    • Act I, Scenes 1 , 2, and 3 (Audio)
    • See, it's not that difficult!


February 8-12, 2010

Monday, February 8: B Day

  • Review List: Gigantic All-Inclusive Word "Cells" List
    (Test on 100+ cells on February 18/19)
  • Fumblerule #3: Reserve the apostrophe for it's proper use and omit it when its not needed.
  • Journal #5 -- Copy and discuss this quote:
    "Talkers are no good doers: be assured
    We go to use our hands and not our tongues."
    Richard III, Act I, Scene 3
  • Shakespeare Packets: Do Not Lose Them!
  • Romeo and Juliet: Listen, follow along, see how much of the study guide you can answer
    • Act I, Scenes 1 , 2, and 3 (Audio)
    • See, it's not that difficult!

Tuesday, February 9: A Day
Wednesday, February 10: B Day

  • Persuasive Essay Final Draft due Today!
  • Bad Signs: How many errors can you find in this e-mail?
  • Fumblerule #4: Use the semicolon properly, use it between complete but related thoughts; and not between an independent clause and a mere phrase.
    (Everybody writes and turns in a Grammar Punk sentence today: A R 4 ; adjective.)
  • Romeo and Juliet: Act I, Scene 4 (Queen Mab)
  • Three Ways to Present Queen Mab: Video
  • Language Arts and Crafts Assignment
    • Draw Queen Mab
      OR
    • Create a visual comparison of some sort (Venn diagram, columns, etc.) of the three versions of the Queen Mab speech that we watched today.
  • Romeo and Juliet: Act I, Scene 5 (They meet!)

Thursday, February 11: A Day
Friday, February 12: B Day (State Swim Meet)

  • Journal #6 -- Romance: Define and discuss. Are you a romantic person? Why or why not? Who's your valentine? (100+)
  • R & J Memorization Assignment: Sign up ASAP!
    Get written and audio copies of your speech!
  • Massive Purple Text, pp. 781-2: How to Read Shakespeare (Aloud)
  • Romeo and Juliet: Act II, Scenes 1 & 2
  • "The Balcony Scene" -- Three ways it has been presented: Video


February 15-19, 2009

Monday, Februrary 15: Presidents' Day

  • No School

Tuesday, February 16: A Day
Wednesday, February 17: B Day

  • Romeo and Juliet: Act II, Scenes 3, 4, 5, & 6
    • Let the pros present today, and fill in the study guide while they do.
  • Reading Survey: Are we commiting readicide?
  • Fumblerule #5: Avoid commas, that are not necessary.
  • Journal #7: Copy this passage from Romeo and Juliet; count the syllables in each line; mark the stressed and unstressed syllables.

    Juliet:
    What storm is this that blows so contrary?
    Is Romeo slaughter'd and is Tybalt dead?
    My dear-lov'd cousin, and my dearer lord?
    Then, dreadful trumpet, sound the general doom!
    For who is living if these two are gone?

    Nurse:
    Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banishèd;
    Romeo that kill'd him, he is banishèd.

  • Sign up for R & J Memorization
    (No one leaves today without a part!)

Thursday, February 18: A Day (Midterm)
Friday, February 19: B Day

  • Word Cells Final Exam: All of 'em
  • R & J Memorization: Get written and audio copies of your speech!
    Presentations begin March 1st!
  • Journal #8: Find and copy three lines/passages from Romeo and Juliet that are still true or applicable to people or things in today's world. Explain how each relates to today as well as Shakespeare's time. The friar's long monologue (Act II, Scene 3) is a good place to look! (100+ words)
  • Romeo and Juliet: Act III, Scene 1: The Death of Mercutio
    • Follow along in text with professional reading.
    • View two versions on video.



February 22-26, 2010

Monday, Februrary 22: A Day

  • Fumblerule #6: Verbs has to agree with their subjects.
  • Big Chunk: Romeo and Juliet: Act III, Scenes 2, 3, 4, 5 (to p. 870)
  • Little Chunk: Close Reading of Scene 4
    • Read carefully with a pencil in hand to annotate the text.
    • Mark any unfamiliar terms or sentences that you do not understand.
    • Note patterns, repetitions, contradictions, similarities.
    • Ask questions about the patterns you notice, especially "how" and "why" questions.
    • Write your responses to the characters' words: What do you think of when you read them? What do they remind you of? Why do you think the characters act as they do?
    • Look for ways the tiny details of the language contribute to and enhance the greater themes, conflicts, and ideas of the story.
    • Turn in your annotated version with lots of comments that illustrate you are actually thinking about and interacting with the text.
    • In the left margin, write the stage directions you would give the actors if you were directing this scene: What would they be doing while they spoke the lines?
    • Due Friday!

Tuesday, February 23: 8-Period Day Schedule

  • 9th Grade Mock Job Interviews
    • Look sharp!
  • 8-Period Schedule
    • Homeroom -- 8:10 - 8:25
    • 1st Period: -- 8:30 - 9:10
    • 2nd Period -- 9:15 - 9:55
    • 3rd Period -- 10:00 - 10:40
    • 4th Period -- 10:45 - 11:25
    • 7th Period -- 11:30 - 12:10
    • Lunch -- 12:10 - 12:40
    • 5th Period -- 12: 45 - 1:25
    • 6th Period -- 1:30 - 2:10
    • 8th Period -- 2:15 - 2:55

Wednesday, February 24: 8-Period Day Schedule

  • 8-Period Schedule
    • Homeroom -- 8:10 - 8:25
    • 1st Period: -- 8:30 - 9:10
    • 5th Period -- 9:15 - 9:55
    • 6th Period -- 10:00 - 10:40
    • 8th Period -- 10:45 - 11:25
    • 3rd Period -- 11:30 - 12:10
    • Lunch -- 12:10 - 12:40
    • 2nd Period -- 12: 45 - 1:25
    • 4th Period -- 1:30 - 2:10
    • 7th Period -- 2:15 - 2:55
  • Short Classes: "Interview Sketch"
  • Journal #1-A: How did your interview go yesterday? Did you feel like the guy in "The Interview Sketch"? Do you think you present yourself well? What did you learn from the experience? What will you do differently next time, when you are interviewing for a real job? (100+)
  • OR
  • Journal #1-B: What has been your favorite part of the Shakespeare unit and why? Is it as bad as you thought it would be? Do you think that knowing something about Shakespeare can ever benefit you in life? Does he entertain you at all, or is it just drudgery? Discuss and explain. (100+)
  • Paraphrasing & Context Clues: MPT, p. 894
  • Paraphrase your own memorized passages.
  • Thank You Notes (???)


Thursday, February 25: B Day (PTC 3:45 - 7:15 P.M.)

  • Fumblerule #6: Verbs has to agree with their subjects.
  • Big Chunk: Romeo and Juliet: Act III, Scenes 2, 3, 4, 5 (to p. 870)
  • Little Chunk: Close Reading of Scene 4
    • Read carefully with a pencil in hand to annotate the text.
    • Mark any unfamiliar terms or sentences that you do not understand.
    • Note patterns, repetitions, contradictions, similarities.
    • Ask questions about the patterns you notice, especially "how" and "why" questions.
    • Write your responses to the characters' words: What do you think of when you read them? What do they remind you of? Why do you think the characters act as they do?
    • Look for ways the tiny details of the language contribute to and enhance the greater themes, conflicts, and ideas of the story.
    • Turn in your annotated version with lots of comments that illustrate you are actually thinking about and interacting with the text.
    • In the left margin, write the stage directions you would give the actors if you were directing this scene: What would they be doing while they spoke the lines?
    • Due Monday!

Friday, February 26: A Day

  • R & J Memorizations will be presented on March 4th & 5th!
    • Get your CDs and MP3s now! Bring me a disk or flash drive!
  • Turn in Close Reading of Scene 4 (^ See instructions above .^)
  • Journal #2: Write an entry of at least 100 words that ends with this: "And that's how I learned a very important lesson about love."
  • Romeo and Juliet
    • Finish Act III together: (Capulet's Freakout)
    • Act IV: Scenes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 on video...but compare the important speeches to the text to see how they differ from movie.
  • Lookin' for Extra Credit? One last chance: pp. 926-933 in MPT (due March 16th)


March 1-5, 2010

Monday, March 1: B Day

  • R & J Memorizations will be presented on March 4th & 5th!
    • Get your CDs and MP3s now! Bring me a disk or flash drive!
  • Turn in Close Reading of Scene 4 (Instructions on Feb. 25)
  • Journal #2: Write an entry of at least 100 words that ends with this: "And that's how I learned a very important lesson about love."
  • Romeo and Juliet
    • Finish Act III together: (Capulet's Freakout)
    • Act IV: Scenes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 on video...but compare the important speeches to the text to see how they differ from movie.
  • Lookin' for Extra Credit? One last chance: pp. 926-933 in MPT (due March 16th)


Tuesday, March 2: A Day -- Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!
Wednesday, March 3: B Day -- Get well, Madey (#55)!

  • Writing Notebook: 100 Journal Topics -- Look over this list and copy 10 of these topics that you think you could write about. Number them from 1 to 10. Someday you will write about each of them, starting now.
  • Journal #3: Write 100+ words about Topic #3.
  • Fumblerule #7: When a dependent clause precedes an independent clause put a comma after the dependent clause. (Comma Rule #5)
  • Finish Romeo and Juliet & Study Guide
  • Act V, Scenes 1, 2, 3
  • Prologue for Act V: Write one. Imitate the rhyme scheme and meter of the other prologues (pp. 787 & 818). Summarize the action in the last act.


Thursday, March 4: A Day
Friday, March 5: B Day



March 8-12, 2010

Monday, March 8: A Day
Tuesday, March 9: B Day

Wednesday, March 10: A Day -- Ms. Guess is in da House!
Thursday, March 11: B Day -- Be good!

  • Journal #4: Revenge--Describe a time you wanted to get back at someone. Why is revenge such a satisfying endeavor? Do you make the punishment fit the crime, or does your payback include "interest"? Discuss vengeance. (100+ words)
  • Poe-cabulary Handout (Don't lose it!)
  • "The Cask of Amontillado" by E.A. Poe (pp.172-182)
  • Poe Biography & Study Guide: Terror of the Soul (Video)


Friday, March 12: A Day

  • Finish video and study guide
  • The Raven
  • Read and Listen.
  • Pair up.
  • "Translate" (paraphrase) an assigned stanza into regular modern English (no rhyme -- just story)
  • Present "Translations" to the class so everyone knows the whole story.
  • Make notes on your own copy of the poem so you will remember what it all means because you're going to...
  • ...work on Study Questions: Due next time!


March 15-19, 2010

Monday, March 15: B Day

  • Finish video and study guide
  • The Raven
  • Read and Listen.
  • Pair up.
  • "Translate" (paraphrase) an assigned stanza into regular modern English (no rhyme -- just story)
  • Present "Translations" to the class so everyone knows the whole story.
  • Make notes on your own copy of the poem so you will remember what it all means because you're going to...
  • ...work on Study Questions: Due next time!

Tuesday, March 16: A Day
Wednesday, March 17: B Day -- AR Points due!

  • Turn in Raven Study Questions and Poe Biography Study Guide
  • Journal #5: Write me a letter about what you did while I was out of town. What did I miss? How did it go? Did you miss me? What do I need to know about my extended absence and the behavior of your classmates? (100 +)
  • Using Poe to Get Ready for the CRT
    • MPT Poe: Informational Text (pp. 183-186)
    • Make a Timeline for the events described in "Poe's Final Days"
    • Analyzing Informational Text (pp. 187-192)
  • Descriptive Lit to Chill Your Bones: "Tell-Tale Heart" -- Audio Only
  • Writing Notebook Scoring

Thursday, March 18: A Day
Friday, March 19: B Day

  • End of Third Term
  • Journal #1: Write 100+ words in response to Topic #6 (from last week's journal topic list).
  • Score/Review Test Practice (MPT, pp. 191-192): Why are the correct answers correct?
  • Poe CRT Practice
  • "Heavy Metal" -- Poe Satire
  • Sustained Silent Reading thanks to Kara G. who demanded it!
  • Let's Talk about your grades and your goals, shall we?
  • Word Clouds
  • Glogster: Online Posters
  • Web 2.0 Tools


"Did I miss anything?" This is the most annoying question students who have been absent can ask. My usual sarcastic reply is something like this: "Oh, heck no! We knew you were gone, so we just sat around all day and looked at each other. You don't really think I'm going to assign work on a day you're not here, do you?" So, in order to keep everyone (students and their parents) apprised of what exactly is going on each day in class, I am going to put it here. Check back often!


We have made every reasonable attempt to insure that our web pages are educationally sound and do not contain links to any questionable material or anything that can be deemed in violation of the DSD Acceptable Use Policy. We have also made every effort to insure that our web pages are free of personality, character, or any other small uniqueness that students might enjoy.
This page is maintained according to the DSD Internet Publishing Guidelines by FFJH Webmasters.

2010 Michael Thompson - All rights reserved.
*<%^)