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Davis School District

January 16-20, 2012: Third Term Begins

Schoolwide 9th Grade Word Cell o' the Week: -ambul- (walk, go)

Monday, January 16

    • Human Rights Day
    • Thank you, Dr. King!
      (And not just for the day off!)

Tuesday, January 17: A Day
Wednesday, January 18: B Day

    • New Term, New Semester, New Classmates, New Seats, New Hall Passes, New Shakespearean Tragedy
    • What to Keep
    • Writing Notebook: During the time we are studying Romeo and Juliet, the Poem o' the Day will be replaced by the Shakespearean Quote o' the Day. Your assignment is to copy the quotation exactly as it is written (including punctuation, line spacing, and source), and then paraphrase it and give an example from your own experience that supports the statement.
    • Shakespearean Quotes o' the Day -- Copy and discuss these quotes:

      "If all the year were playing holidays,
      To sport would be as tedious as to work."

      -- Henry IV, Part 2: Act II, Scene 1

      Example: I think this quotation means that if your whole life is a vacation (playing holidays), even playing (sport) gets boring (tedious). I see this in my own life at the end of summer, when I've been out of school for more than two months. I actually look forward to going back because I get bored when I don't have anything I HAVE to do.

      "O, it is excellent
      To have a giant's strength,
      but it is tyrannous
      To use it like a giant."

      --Measure for Measure: Act II, Scene 2
    • Close Read The Prologue from Romeo and Juliet (and paraphrase in WN)
    • Three Ways to Present The Prologue: Audio/Video
    • Why is Shakespeare hard?
      • The Point: Part of the reason modern readers consider Shakespeare boring and/or incomprehensible (besides the fact that most of them have the critical thinking skills of third graders) is because Shakespeare's plays and language are the product of a world that is nothing like ours. His characters, however, illustrate that while the world is very different now, people are still much the same. We have the same emotions, flaws, and passions as people have had throughout history. By understanding a little about the time and place in which the plays were written, it can help modern readers get past all the unfamiliar stuff and enjoy the human stories that we can all relate to.
      • "How to Read Shakespeare" (MPT: p. 781-2)
    • Drama: Academic Vocabulary (This is what you need to watch for while we study Romeo and Juliet.)
    • Assignment of R&J Passages: Analyze (close read) your passage. Your job is to become the expert on your assigned part, so that when we encounter that passage in our study of the play, YOU can help us understand it. Also, you will later memorize a section of your assigned passage to recite aloud for the class. (But more on that later. For now, just do the analysis. This website will help.)
    • Reading Assignment: Paraphrase your assigned passage. (Fill out the worksheet.) Dust off the Massive Purple Text you have at home! Locate your assigned passage therein and read it over. Examine the pictures and margin notes to help with your close reading. Starting next time, there will be a reading schedule for Romeo and Juliet.


Thursday, January 19: A Day
Friday, January 20: B Day

    • Turn in the paraphrase of your assigned passage.
    • WN: So, what d'ya think of the new class? New semester? New faces? New classes? (100+)
    • WN: Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "The sweetest honey
      Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
      And in the taste confounds the appetite."

      --Romeo and Juliet: Act II, Scene 6
    • Shakespeare's Language:
      A Glossary of Common Terms & Shakespearean Insults & More Shakespearean Insults (Create your own!)
    • WN: Write your own Shakespearean Dialogue!
    • Romeo and Juliet: Listen, follow along, and see if you get it.
      • Act I, Scene 1 (Audio)
    • Word Cells o' the Day: -clud- / -fin-
    • (New Neologulsion page: Do the first one using one or more of these.)
    • Homework (Reading Schedule): Act I, Scenes 2 & 3
    • (There will be a quiz next time. Read carefully and use margin notes!)



January 23-27, 2012: -port-

Monday, January 23: A Day
Tuesday, January 24: B Day

    • Comprehension Quiz: Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scenes 2 & 3
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "Talkers are no good doers: be assured
      We go to use our hands and not our tongues."

      Richard III, Act I, Scene 3
    • In-class Reading: Act I, Scene 4 (Queen Mab)
    • "Lecture"
      • What is a dramatic foil? (Define on your drama vocab. handout.)
      • Why are some words given stress marks on the -èd ending
        (banishèd, punishèd, upturnèd)?
    • Video: Three ways Queen Mab Could be Presented
    • Discussion Question: Which one did you like the best? Why? (Give specific reasons.) Write your response on the back of your Scene 2/3 quiz.
    • Word Cells o' the Day: -con-...and its many variants
    • Neologulsion: Do the second one using one or more of these: -co-, -com-, -con-, -cor-, -col-, or -port-.
    • GP Semicolon Rule #1: Use a semicolon to join independent clauses. (In this instance, a semicolon and a period operate the same way. A semicolon would be used to emphasize that the independent clauses are closely related. DO NOT use a conjunction when joining independent clauses with a semicolon!)
      Example: I went to the swimming pool; I swam twenty laps.
      Example #2 (NE6 ; adj.): Queen Mab is one of the meanest women in mythology; she ensures strange dreams.
    • Grammar Punk Hall of Fame: Are you in there, yet?
    • Homework Reading: Scene 5 (They meet!)
    • (There will be a quiz next time. Read carefully and use margin notes!)


Wednesday, January 25: A Day
Thursday, January 26: B Day

    • Comprehension Quiz/Review: Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scene 5
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "The harder matched, the greater victory."
      Henry VI, Part 3: Act V, Scene 1
    • "Lecture": Finish definitions on Drama Vocab. Handout
      • Irony: Verbal, Situational, Dramatic
      • Why does Shakespeare seem to be apostrophe crazy: fall'st, speak'st, o'er, e'er, 'Tis, etc.?
    • In-class from text: The Balcony Scene (Act II, Scenes 1 & 2) -- Audio
    • The Balcony Scene x 3: Video Comparison
    • In-class (if time): Act II, Scene 3 (Meet Friar Laurence!)
    • Homework Reading: Through Act II, Scene 4


Friday, January 27: A Day

    • Comprehension Quiz: Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 4
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "Pleasure and action make the hours seem short."
      Othello, Act II, Scene 3
    • In-class: Act II, Scenes 5 & 6 + Act III Scene 1 (with audio)
    • Video: The Death of Mercutio (x3)
    • Homework: Read Act III, Scenes 2 & 3
      (+ Scene 4 Close Reading Assignment)
    • All students were given a copy of Scene 4 to write on. On the front was Shakespeare's original, and on the back was a modern "translation." Pretend that YOU are the director of this scene.
    • On the FRONT (Shakespeare's original) do the following:
      • Mark your confusion & check with the translation to clarify.
      • In the right margin, paraphrase the dialogue.
      • In the left margin, write specific stage directions for each line of dialogue. (What is the character doing while he speaks his lines?)
      • At the bottom, explain the dramatic irony: What things do the audience know that the characters do not?



January 30 - February 3, 2012

Monday, January 30: B Day

    • Comprehension Quiz: Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 4
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "Pleasure and action make the hours seem short."
      Othello, Act II, Scene 3
    • In-class: Act II, Scenes 5 & 6 + Act III Scene 1 (with audio)
    • Video: The Death of Mercutio (x3)
    • Homework: Read Act III, Scenes 2 & 3
      (+ Scene 4 Close Reading Assignment)
    • All students were given a copy of Scene 4 to write on. On the front was Shakespeare's original, and on the back was a modern "translation." Pretend that YOU are the director of this scene.
    • On the FRONT (Shakespeare's original) do the following:
      • Mark your confusion & check with the translation to clarify.
      • In the right margin, paraphrase the dialogue.
      • In the left margin, write specific stage directions for each line of dialogue. (What is the character doing while he speaks his lines?)
      • At the bottom, explain the dramatic irony: What things do the audience know that the characters do not?


Tuesday, January 31: A Day
Wednesday, February 1: B Day (Read-a-Thon in Homeroom)

    • Turn in Director's Close Read of Act III, Scene 4 OR Take Reading Quiz
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "O sir, to willful men
      The injuries that they themselves procure
      Must be their schoolmasters."

      King Lear, Act II, Scene 4
    • Return Passages for Memorization: Memorize and Practice Reciting at least 12-16 lines (end at a logical place; do not stop in the middle of a sentence). Presentations will be on February 8/9.
    • Romeo and Juliet: Act III, Scene 5
    • Begin Act IV (with study guide)
    • Word Cells o' the Day: -pel-/-puls- / -tract-
    • (Do another new word on the Neologulsion page.)
    • Workin' on the back of the Drama Vocab. Handout yet?
    • Homework: Finish Act IV and study guide


Thursday, February 2
Friday, February 3

    • Turn in study guide for Act IV (in lieu of quiz)
    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "All things that are
      Are with more spirit chased than enjoyed."

      The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene 6
    • Writing Notebook: Paraphrasing Practice (MPT, p. 894)
      You should be getting pretty good at this by now...but don't confuse summarizing with paraphrasing.
    • Act IV: Scenes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 on video -- Compare the important speeches to the text to see how they differ from movie.
    • Act V, Scenes 1 & 2: You play the parts! ("Table Read")
    • 4th - 7th: Word Cells o' the Day: -pel-/-puls- / -tract-
    • (Do another new word on the Neologulsion page.)
    • Workin' on the back of the Drama Vocab. Handout yet?
    • Homework: Memorized Passages (12-16 lines) due February 8/9!




February 6-10, 2012: -ven-

Monday, February 6: A Day
Tuesday, February 7: B Day

    • Shakespearean Quote o' the Day -- Copy, paraphrase, and give an example to support this quote:
      "Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice."
      Hamlet, Act I, Scene 3
    • Finish Romeo and Juliet: Act V, Scene 3 (You play the parts!)
    • Turn in R&J Drama Vocab. Worksheet + Shakespeare-related stuff
    • Writing Assignment: Are Romeo and Juliet tragic heroes? Why or why not? Provide specific examples from the play to support your reasoning.
    • Extra Credit Opportunity: Comparing a Play and a Film
      Massive Purple Text, p. 926-933
      Compare a film version of Romeo and Juliet to Shakespeare's written version. Follow the instructions in the Massive Purple Text.
      Due February 15th!
    • WN: Review GP Semicolon Rule #1: Write a sentence about Romeo and Juliet that illustrates this rule; moreover, add an independent marker to that sentence to also illustrate...
    • WN: GP Semicolon Rule #2: Use a semicolon before an independent marker that connects independent clauses.. (What's an independent marker?)
      Example: I went to the swimming pool; however, I did not swim very far.


Wednesday, February 8: A Day
Thursday, February 9: B Day

    • Review the Play: Present Romeo and Juliet Memorizations
    • Writing Notebook: What was your take on Romeo and Juliet? Did you like it? Hate it? Why? Was it as good or bad as you expected? Were you able to make sense of it on your own after a couple weeks of practice? Can you see why it is still popular? Would you ever willingly try to read/view/study another Shakespeare play? Discuss. (100+)
    • Writing Notebook Evaluation
    • Schoolwide Word Cell o' the Week: -ven-
    • Word Cell o' the Day: -ex- / -e- / -ec-
    • (Do another new word on the Neologulsion page.)
    • Grammar Punk: Review Semicolon Rules 1 & 2
    • Return Drama Worksheet to study for test next time.


Friday, February 10: A Day

    • "Reduced" Romeo and Juliet
    • Final (Objective) Test on Romeo and Juliet
    • (This was a great idea to practice genre writing, but we didn't actually do it because we needed to get going on mythology....but next year, for sure!)
      Letters from Verona -- Take on the "voice" of one of the following characters: Romeo, Juliet, Nurse, or Friar Laurence. (You become that character, using the first-person -- I, me, mine, etc. -- and express that character's concerns and personality.) Write a letter to one of the other characters. Do not just copy a passage from the play, but make up something that may have been written between the scenes. For example, you may choose to write Romeo's suicide note that Prince Escalus refers to at the end of the play. You could write the letter Juliet may have sent after the nurse told her to marry Paris. You might write the undelivered letter that Friar Laurence sent to Romeo. Your letter should indicate that you have a firm understanding of the story and that you are creative enough to consider how the character would feel and express him/herself. This should be a substantial piece of writing, not just a quick and sloppy hack job.
    • What do you already know about Greek Mythology?




February 13-17, 2012: -ced-/-ceed-/-cess-

Monday, Februrary 13: B Day

    • Final (Objective) Test on Romeo and Juliet
    • What do you already know about Greek Mythology?
    • Midterm


Tuesday, February 14: A Day (Library)
Wednesday, February 15: B Day (Library) -- PT Conferences

    • Library: Mythology Research
    • Topic Assignments: Essential Questions
    • Library Research Handout (Find the answer to your Essential Question!)
    • Homework: Close Read "The War with the Titans"
      Comprehension, Summarizing, and Evaluating


Thursday, February 16: A Day (Library & Lab 202)
Friday, February 17: No School



February 20-24, 2012: -duc-/-duct-

Monday, Februrary 20: Day of Presidents (No School)
Tuesday, February 21: B Day (Library & Lab)


Wednesday, February 22: A Day (Lab 202: 45-60 min.)
Thursday, February 23: B Day (Lab 202: 45-60 min.)

    • Class Work:
    • Word Cell o' the Week: -duc-/-duct-
    • Oops! Forgot these last week: -ced-/-ceed-/-cess-
    • (Do another new word on the Neologulsion page.)
    • Quiz/Discussion: "Epic & Myth" Reading Assignment
    • How to read epic poetry: As with Shakespearean poetry, read to the punctuation, not line-to-line.
      (Do you understand it? Can you summarize it? Why would Homer try to tell a story this long with poetry? If it's poetry, why doesn't it rhyme?)
    • Trojan War: The Basics
    • In-Class Practice: Homer's Prayer to the Muse (MPT, p. 651)
    • Homework: Calypso, The Sweet Nymph (pp. 651-654)
    • Lab Work:
      Here is a model paper that illustrates how yours should be done.
    • Finish Draft of Research Paper & Print it!
    • If time: Change your display name on Goodreads to reflect your current class period.
      (Review on a book of choice due March 10!)
    • If you have time, run this presentation to finish the Mythology Grid


Friday, February 24: A Day

    • Turn in rough draft or outline of your myth research paper.
    • Word Cell o' the Day: -re-
    • (Have you lost the lists of prefixes & suffixes? Print another one from home!)
    • Do another new word on the Neologulsion page. (Only one more to go after this! Make sure yours is complete!)
    • Poem o' the Day: Since much of classical mythology (and all of The Odyssey) was originally written in poetic verse, the Poem o' the Day will be replaced by these myths and stories for the duration of our mythology unit.
    • Quiz on Homework Reading: Calypso (MPT, p. 652-654)
    • WN: "Calypso" by Suzanne Vega (MPT, p. 665): Listen to the song "Calypso" by Suzanne Vega (lyrics on page 655). What is the tone of the song? Does it help you understand the story? What does it tell you that the song was inspired by a story that is more than 3000 years old? What timeless themes are addressed? (100+)

    • The Odyssey: I am Laertes' Son, The Lotus Eaters (pp. 655-659)
    • The Odyssey: The Cyclops (pp. 660-670)
    • Epithets (WN): Read page 715 in The Massive Purple Text. In your Writing Notebook, write suitable descriptive epithets for ten people you know, including yourself.
    • Homework: The Enchantress Circe, pp.673-675
    • The Land of the Dead, pp. 675-677
    • In place of a quiz, you will turn in this passage summary worksheet. Have it down when you get here next time!
      (Don't get it? Here's a model based on the section we read in class today.)





February 27 - March 2, 2012: -ten-/-tain-

Monday, February 27: B Day

  • Turn in rough draft or outline of your myth research paper.
  • Word Cell o' the Day: -re-
  • (Have you lost the lists of prefixes & suffixes? Print another one from home!)
  • Do another new word on the Neologulsion page. (Only one more to go after this! Make sure yours is complete!)
  • Poem o' the Day: Since much of classical mythology (and all of The Odyssey) was originally written in poetic verse, the Poem o' the Day will be replaced by these myths and stories for the duration of our mythology unit.
  • Quiz on Homework Reading: Calypso (MPT, p. 652-654)
  • WN: "Calypso" by Suzanne Vega (MPT, p. 665): Listen to the song "Calypso" by Suzanne Vega (lyrics on page 655). What is the tone of the song? Does it help you understand the story? What does it tell you that the song was inspired by a story that is more than 3000 years old? What timeless themes are addressed? (100+)

  • The Odyssey: I am Laertes' Son, The Lotus Eaters (pp. 655-659)
  • The Odyssey: The Cyclops (pp. 660-670)
  • Epithets (WN): Read page 715 in The Massive Purple Text. In your Writing Notebook, write suitable descriptive epithets for ten people you know, including yourself.
  • Homework: The Enchantress Circe, pp.673-675
  • The Land of the Dead, pp. 675-677
  • In place of a quiz, you will turn in this passage summary worksheet. Have it down when you get here next time!
    (Don't get it? Here's a model based on the section we read in class today.)



Tuesday, February 28: 8-period Day (Lab 202)


Wednesday, February 29: 8-period Day (Interviews) (Lab 202)

    • All classes are shortened again today, and we will participate in the mock job interviews during English class. This will probably not take the entire period, and we will have access to the lab for those who did not finish their revisions yesterday.
    • Evaluate your second draft with this checklist.
    • Turn in everything in this order:
    • Top: Checklist
    • Typed second draft
    • Works Cited Page
    • First (very rough) draft
    • Bottom: Library Research Worksheet
    • Note: Reading Schedule has been altered slightly. No homework reading tonight. We will do it all in class tomorrow and Friday!


Thursday, March 1: A Day
Friday, March 2: B Day (Sub.)

  • Turn in Research Paper in this order:
  • In-class Reading: The Sirens; Scylla and Charibdis, pp. 678-683 & The Cattle of the Sun God, pp. 684-686
  • Assignment: Do these on a separate paper to hand in TODAY.
  • Answer questions 1-7 on page 687.
  • Writing Notebook (Genre Writing): Choose any of the adventures in the first part of The Odyssey (except Calypso) and write a letter from another character to Odysseus. Take on the voice of that character and address the issues that character would feel are important. (200+)
  • Word Cells: Add -ten-/-tin-/-tain-
  • Do the last new word on the Neologulsion page. Turn it in!
  • Homework: Write a one-paragraph summary of "Coming Home," p. 690. (You are summarizing a summary.)


March 5-9, 2012: -hal-

Monday, March 5: A Day
Tuesday, March 6: B Day

  • Turn in your summary of "Coming Home" (MPT, p. 690).
  • Writing Notebook: How was your job interview last week? Were you nervous? Anything unexpected occur? Do you think this was a valuable experience that will help you later on when the interview is for real? What did you learn that you didn't know before? Discuss. (100+)
  • Homeric Similes (MPT, p. 688): Read the instructions and complete the assignment called "Practice 2," which includes explaining one of the Homeric similes in the text as well as writing three (3) Homeric similes of your own.
  • The Odyssey: All this is in-class reading. (And I did most of it!).
  • The Meeting of Father and Son, pp. 691-694
  • The Beggar and the Faithful Dog, pp 694-695
  • Summary: The Epic Continues (1 paragraph each x 7)
  • The Test of the Great Bow, pp. 698-702
  • Review this presentation to finish the Mythology Grid (for test).
  • Research Paper: Drafts will be handed back today. Using the checklist from last week and this Research Paper Review, annotate your draft so you can make any needed corrections. This will be the last time we talk about the research papers before the final drafts are submitted and scored.
  • Homework: Using the suggestions from the Research Paper Review, revise your research paper one final time, making sure it meets all the requirements. Have a digital file that contains the final draft next time! You can e-mail it to yourself, bring it on a flash drive, or use your MyDSD "locker," but you have to have it here and it has to be digital. No more paper drafts will be submitted.
  • 5th/6th Periods:
  • Word Cells: Add -ten-/-tin-/-tain-
  • Do the last new word on the Neologulsion page. Turn it in!


Wednesday, March 7: A Day (Lab 202)
Thursday, March 8: B Day (Lab 202)

  • Students were to bring a digital version of the final draft of your research paper (flash drive, e-mail to self, etc.).
  • Log in to Utah Write.
  • Open the topic called "Research Paper."
  • Copy and paste your final draft (with Works Cited Page) into the text field and submit for scoring. You may re-submit one time to improve your score, but keep in mind that I am the one who will ultimately give the paper a final grade. It is more important to impress me than to impress the computer.
  • Log in to Goodreads and change your display name onto reflect your current class period. (Review on a book of choice due March 10! That's a Saturday, and it is due FOR EVERYONE on that day: A-day AND B-day!) Don't forget to put the outline in the box so I know to look for yours!)
  • Log in to the Class Wiki. Find your page (even though it may no longer contain the correct period -- that will be fixed soon) and post the following on it (at the top of the page, above all the old stuff):
    • The best new word and complete wiktionary definition from your Neologolusion page. Follow the example at the top of the Neologolusion paper.
    • Your most descriptive and powerful Homeric simile from the last class session.
  • Review this presentation to finish the Mythology Grid (for test).
  • Finish The Odyssey: Death at the Palace, pp. 703-705
  • Odysseus and Penelope, pp. 706-709

Friday, March 9: A Day

  • The Odyssey Review Quiz/Discussion
  • Mythological Heroes: Take Notes
  • The Odyssey Movie
  • Open-note Mythology Test Next Week
    • Mythology Grid
    • "War With the Titans"
    • Heroes/Character Notes (from today)
  • Book Reviews due (on Goodreads) Tomorrow!




March 12-16, 2012: -mar-

Monday, March 12: B Day

  • The Odyssey Review Quiz/Discussion
  • Mythological Heroes: Take Notes
  • The Odyssey Movie
  • Open-note Mythology Test Next Week
    • Mythology Grid
    • "War With the Titans"
    • Heroes/Character Notes (from today)

Tuesday, March 13: A Day
Wednesday, March 14: B Day

  • The Odyssey Movie

Thursday, March 15: A Day
Friday, March 16: B Day

  • Mythology Test of Epic Proportions: Term Test (Open Notes)
  • Writing Notebook: Third Term Reflection -- How did it go? Did it fly by or drag? Did you do your best work? Were there unexpected surprises? Discuss. (100+)
  • Last Chance Extra Credit: Word Cells Review Crossword
    (Use word cells lists to find "literal definitions")
  • End of Third Term!


"Did I miss anything?" This is the most annoying question students who have been absent can ask. My usual sarcastic reply is something like this: "Oh, heck no! We knew you were gone, so we just sat around all day and looked at each other. You don't really think I'm going to assign work on a day you're not here, do you?" So, in order to keep everyone (students and their parents) apprised of what exactly is going on each day in class, I am going to put it here. Check back often!


We have made every reasonable attempt to insure that our web pages are educationally sound and do not contain links to any questionable material or anything that can be deemed in violation of the DSD Acceptable Use Policy. We have also made every effort to insure that our web pages are free of personality, character, or any other small uniqueness that students might enjoy.
This page is maintained according to the DSD Internet Publishing Guidelines by FFJH Webmasters.

2012 Michael Thompson - All rights reserved.
*<%^)